74th United States Congress

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74th United States Congress
73rd ← → 75th
USCapitol1956.jpg
United States Capitol (1956)

Duration: January 3, 1935 – January 3, 1937

Senate President: John N. Garner
Senate Pres. pro tem: Key Pittman
House Speaker: Joseph W. Byrns, Sr.
William B. Bankhead
Members: 96 Senators
435 Representatives
5 Non-voting members
Senate Majority: Democratic
House Majority: Democratic

Sessions
1st: January 3, 1935 – August 26, 1935
2nd: January 3, 1936 – June 20, 1936

The Seventy-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1935 to January 3, 1937, during the third and fourth years of Franklin Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Fifteenth Census of the United States in 1930. Both chambers had a Democratic supermajority.

Contents

Major events[edit]

President Roosevelt signs Social Security Act, at approximately 3:30 pm EST on August 14, 1935.[3] Standing with Roosevelt are Rep. Robert Doughton (D-NC); unknown person in shadow; Sen. Robert Wagner (D-NY); Rep. John Dingell (D-MI); unknown man in bowtie; the Secretary of Labor, Frances Perkins; Sen. Pat Harrison (D-MS); and Rep. David Lewis (D-MD).

Major legislation[edit]

Party summary[edit]

Senate[edit]

Party
(Shading shows control)
Total Vacant
Democratic
(D)
Farmer-Labor
(FL)
Wisconsin Progressive
(P)
Republican
(R)
Other
End of the previous congress 60 1 0 35 0 96 0
Begin 70 1 1 23 0 95 1
End 73 21 96 0
Final voting share 76.0% 1.0% 1.0% 21.9% 0.0%
Beginning of the next congress 75 2 1 16 1 95 1

House[edit]

Party Members
Democrats 322
Republicans 103
Progressive 7
Farmer-Labor 3
Total 435

Also 2 Delegates, 3 Resident Commissioners

Leaders[edit]

[ Section contents: Senate: Majority (D), Minority (R)House: Majority (D), Minority (R) ]

Senate[edit]

Majority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

Minority (Republican) leadership[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

Majority (Democratic) leadership[edit]

Minority (Republican) leadership[edit]

Members[edit]

Senate[edit]

Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election.

Percentage of members from each party by state at the opening of the 74th Congress, ranging from dark blue (most Democratic) to dark red (most Republican).

House of Representatives[edit]

The names of members are preceded by their district numbers.

Changes of Membership[edit]

The count below reflects changes from the beginning of this Congress.

Senate[edit]

State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
West Virginia
(1)
Vacant Holt qualified late due to age. Rush D. Holt, Sr. (D) June 21, 1935
New Mexico
(1)
Bronson M. Cutting (R) Died May 6, 1935. Successor was appointed to serve until the next election, and was subsequently elected. Dennis Chavez (D) May 11, 1935
Louisiana
(2)
Huey Long (D) Died September 10, 1935. Successor was appointed to serve until the next election. Rose McConnell Long (D) January 31, 1936
Minnesota
(2)
Thomas D. Schall (R) Died December 22, 1935. Successor was appointed to serve until the next election. Elmer Austin Benson (FL) December 27, 1935
Florida
(1)
Park Trammell (D) Died May 8, 1936. Successor was appointed to serve until the next election. Scott Loftin (D) May 26, 1936
Florida
(3)
Duncan U. Fletcher (D) Died June 17, 1936. Successor was appointed to serve until the next election. William Luther Hill (D) July 1, 1936
Iowa
(3)
Richard L. Murphy (D) Died July 16, 1936. Successor was elected. Guy Gillette (D) November 3, 1936
Michigan
(2)
James J. Couzens (R) Died October 22, 1936. Successor was appointed to serve until the next election. Prentiss M. Brown (D) November 19, 1936
Minnesota
(2)
Elmer Austin Benson (FL) Successor was elected November 3, 1936. Guy V. Howard (R) November 3, 1936
Florida
(1)
Scott Loftin (D) Successor was elected November 3, 1936. Charles O. Andrews (D) November 4, 1936
Florida
(3)
William Luther Hill (D) Successor was elected November 3, 1936. Claude Pepper (D) November 4, 1936
South Dakota
(3)
Peter Norbeck (R) Died December 20, 1936. Successor was appointed to serve until the next election. Herbert E. Hitchcock (D) December 29, 1936

House of Representatives[edit]

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date successor
seated
Indiana 2nd Vacant Rep.-elect Frederick Landis died before being sworn in Charles A. Halleck (R) January 29, 1935
Rhode Island 1st Francis Condon (D) Resigned January 10, 1935 after being appointed associate justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court Charles Risk (R) August 6, 1935
New York 22nd Anthony J. Griffin (D) Died January 13, 1935 Edward W. Curley (D) November 5, 1935
Alabama 1st John McDuffie (D) Resigned March 2, 1935 after being appointed judge in US district court Frank W. Boykin (D) July 30, 1935
Illinois At-large Michael L. Igoe (D) Resigned June 2, 1935 after being appointed a US Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois Vacant until the next Congress
Kentucky 4th Cap R. Carden (D) Died June 13, 1935 Edward W. Creal (D) November 5, 1935
Ohio At-large Charles V. Truax (D) Died August 9, 1935 Daniel S. Earhart (D) November 3, 1936
Illinois 23rd William W. Arnold (D) Resigned September 16, 1935 after being appointed a member of the US Board of Tax Appeals Vacant until the next Congress
New York 2nd William F. Brunner (D) Resigned September 27, 1935 after being elected Sheriff of Queens County, New York William B. Barry (D) November 5, 1935
Michigan 3rd Henry M. Kimball (R) Died October 19, 1935 Verner Main (R) December 17, 1935
Washington 6th Wesley Lloyd (D) Died January 10, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Resident Commissioner to the US House of Representatives from the Philippine Islands Francisco A. Delgado (NAC) Resigned February 14, 1936 after a successor qualified in accordance to a new form of government Quintin Paredes (NAC) February 14, 1936
Resident Commissioner to the US House of Representatives from the Philippine Islands Pedro Guevara (NAC) Resigned February 14, 1936 after the 2nd seat was abolished None
New York 9th Stephen A. Rudd (D) Died March 31, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Ohio 11th Mell G. Underwood (D) Resigned April 10, 1936 after being appointed to the US District Court for the Southern District of Ohio Peter F. Hammond (D) November 3, 1936
Illinois 12th John T. Buckbee (R) Died April 23, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
New York 29th William D. Thomas (R) Died May 17, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
New Jersey 7th Randolph Perkins (R) Died May 25, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Massachusetts 6th A. Piatt Andrew (R) Died June 3, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Tennessee 5th Jo Byrns (D) Died June 4, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Washington 5th Samuel B. Hill (D) Resigned June 25, 1936 after being appointed a member of the US Board of Tax Appeals Vacant until the next Congress
Iowa 2nd Bernhard M. Jacobsen (D) Died June 30, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Ohio 9th Warren J. Duffey (D) Died July 7, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
South Carolina 4th John J. McSwain (D) Died August 6, 1936 Gabriel H. Mahon, Jr. (D) November 3, 1936
Washington 1st Marion Zioncheck (D) Died August 7, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Kentucky 1st William V. Gregory (D) Died October 10, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress
Iowa 9th Guy Gillette (D) Resigned November 3, 1936 after being elected to the US Senate Vacant until the next Congress
Michigan 11th Prentiss M. Brown (D) Resigned November 18, 1936 after being appointed to the US Senate Vacant until the next Congress
Kentucky 2nd Glover H. Cary (D) Died December 5, 1936 Vacant until the next Congress

Employees[edit]

Senate[edit]

House[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Huey Long Filibusters". senate.gov. 
  2. ^ a b "First Official Parliamentarian". senate.gov. 
  3. ^ http://www.ssa.gov/history/1930.html
  4. ^ The Vice President of the United States serves as the President of the Senate. See U.S. Constitution, Article I, Section 3, Clause 4
  5. ^ No Republican whips were appointed from 1935 to 1944 since only 17 Republicans were in the Senate following the landslide reelection of President Franklin Roosevelt in 1936. Accordingly, the minutes of the Republican Conference for the period state: "On motion of Senator Hastings, duly seconded and carried, it was agreed that no Assistant Leader or Whip be elected but that the chairman be authorized to appoint Senators from time to time to assist him in taking charge of the interests of the minority." A note attached to the conference minutes added: "The chairman of the conference, Senator McNary, apparently appointed Senator Austin of Vermont as assistant leader in 1943 and 1944, until the conference adopted Rules of Organization." Source: Party Whips, via Senate.gov