Sextus Appuleius

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Sextus Appuleius is the name of four figures during the 1st century BC and 1st century AD. The first Sextus Appuleius was married to Octavia Major, the elder half-sister of Augustus. The three subsequent figures named Sextus Appuleius are respectively the son, grandson and great-grandson of Sextus Appuleius (I) and Octavia Major.[1]

Sextus Appuleius (I)[edit]

Date of his birth and death are unknown.

He married Octavia Major, the elder half-sister of Augustus, by whom he had at least one son, also named Sextus Appuleius (II). It is postulated that he had a second son, Marcus Appuleius, the consul of 20 BC.[2]

It is possible that this Sextus Appuleius was Flamen Iulialis.[3][4][5]

Sextus Appuleius (II)[edit]

Sextus Appuleius (II) was the son of Sextus Appuleius (I) and Octavia Major, the elder half-sister of Augustus.[1] The year of his birth is uncertain, but, based the date of his consulship, was probably in the late 60s BC.

This Sextus Appuleius achieved a number of notable offices during the reign of his half-uncle. He was ordinary consul with Augustus in 29 BC. He then served as proconsul of Hispania in 28 BC, then as proconsul of Asia 23-22 BC. As a result of some unspecified event during this proconsulship he was granted a Roman Triumph in January 26 BC.[6]

He seems also to have served as governor of Illyricum in 8 BC, succeeding Tiberius in that post.[6] He was a member of the college of augurs.[7]

It is possible that it was this Sextus Appuleius, and not his father, who was Flamen Iulialis.[3][5][8]

According to an inscription in the province of Asia,[9] he was married to a woman named Quinctilia, who was a sister to the Roman politician and general, Publius Quinctilius Varus.[10] By her, he had a son, also named Sextus Appuleius (III).[6]

It has been proposed that the middle-aged flamen on the Ara Pacis is this Sextus Appuleius in his role as Flamen Iulialis[11] [3].

The date of his death is unknown.

Sextus Appuleius (III)[edit]

Sextus Appuleius (III) was the son of Sextus Appuleius (II) and Quinctilia. This Sextus Appuleius (III) was also a half-great-nephew of Augustus via his father.

His career is largely unknown, except that he became ordinary consul in the year 14.[12]

It was during his consulship in 14, that his half-great-uncle, Augustus, died and was succeeded by Tiberius. Appuleius was the first to swear allegiance to Tiberius.[13]

He was married to Fabia Numantina, a daughter of either Africanus Fabius Maximus, or Paullus Fabius Maximus and Marcia, a maternal cousin of Augustus.[14]

Appuleius and Fabia had one son, also named Sextus Appuleius (IV).[10]

It is assumed he died not long after 14 because he is not mentioned subsequent to his consulship. He was survived by his wife, Claudia Marcella Major (niece of Roman emperor Augustus) and their daughter Appuleia Varilla.[15]

Sextus Appuleius (IV)[edit]

The son of the previous Sextus Appuleius (III) and Fabia Numantina.

He was born sometime in the early 1st century, but died young; his tombstone at Luna,[1][16] set up by his mother, refers to him as "the last of his family" (the Appuleii).[1][10]

Preceded by
Augustus IV and Lucius Saenius
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Augustus V
29 BC
Succeeded by
Augustus VI and Potitus Valerius Messalla
Preceded by
Gaius Silius Aulus Caecina Largus and Lucius Munatius Plancus
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Sextus Pompeius
14
Succeeded by
Julius Caesar Drusus and Gaius Norbanus Flaccus

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Braund, D., Augustus to Nero: A Source Book on Roman History 31 BC - AD 68 (1985), p. 129 [1]
  2. ^ Syme, Ronald, Augustan Aristocracy (1989), p. 37
  3. ^ a b ILS 8963; Carthage
  4. ^ Pollini, J., 'Ahenobarbi, Appuleii and Some Others on the Ara Pacis', pp. 456-8
  5. ^ a b Syme, R., Augustan Aristocracy (1989), p. 152
  6. ^ a b c Syme, R., Augustan Aristocracy (1989), p. 317
  7. ^ Braund, D., Augustus to Nero: A Source Book on Roman History 31 BC - AD 68 (1985), p. 129 [2]
  8. ^ Pollini, J., 'Ahenobarbi, Appuleii and Some Others on the Ara Pacis', pp. 457/8
  9. ^ AE 1966, 422
  10. ^ a b c Syme, R., Augustan Aristocracy (1989), p. 316
  11. ^ Pollini, J., 'Ahenobarbi, Appuleii and Some Others on the Ara Pacis', p. 458
  12. ^ Syme, R., Augustan Aristocracy (1989), p. 318
  13. ^ Tacitus, Annals I.8
  14. ^ Syme, R., Augustan Aristocracy (1989), pp. 417/8
  15. ^ Tacitus, The Annals of Imperial Rome: Genealogical Tables - Table 1: Family of Tiberius, p.431
  16. ^ ILS 935