Fey (Dungeons & Dragons)

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In Dungeons & Dragons, Fey is a category of creatures (called a creature type in the game). The fey deities are based around the Seelie Court and the Unseelie Court. Titania is the general fey deity, with individual races like the Killmoulis who worship Caoimhin. Fey are usually humanoid in form and generally have supernatural abilities and a connection to nature. The Sylph is one creature which has a Fae appearance, but is officially recognized as an outsider creature type.

The source material includes two templates for players who wish have crossbred characters incorporating fey traits. The first is the Half Fey, a the cross between a fey and a human or giant. The template was introduced in the Fiend Folio. Feytouched are one quarter fey, the result of a crossbreeding between a Half Fey and a human or giant. All feytouched have at least one feature or characteristic that is out of the norm, including vibrantly colored hair, feathered eyebrows, or a propensity for speaking in rhyme, for example, and are charismatic. The feytouched template appeared in the third edition Fiend Folio (2003).[1]

Atomie[edit]

The atomie is the lightest and quickest of all the sprites, standing at less than one foot tall. An atomie has elven features, with pale skin with a hint of woodland green, and four dragonfly-like wings. An atomie's voice is high-pitched, sounding like the buzzing of a bee. Atomies have magical abilities, and sometimes carry weapons as well. Upon hearing an intruder, atomies hide and try to make the intruder go away, using false lights, clattering voices, and pesky, summoned insects. Atomies live in forests, in the upper branches of old hardwood trees, one family per tree. Each family hollows out a series of tiny rooms, decorating with walnut chairs, woven pine needle rugs, acorn dishes, and the like. A network of balconies, landings, and rope bridges connects the dwellings, forming a village high above the forest floor. Atomies seldom bother with outsiders.

The atomie first appeared in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983).[2] It appeared in the second edition for the Greyhawk setting in the Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix (1990) under the "sprite" entry.,[3] the Monstrous Manual (1993).[4]

The atomie appeared in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[5] It is was also featured in Paizo Publishing's book Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary 3 (2011), on page 28.[6] It also makes an appearance in the Castles & Crusades Classic Monsters the Manual.[7]

Banshrae[edit]

Banshrae are usually malevolent fey. They are insectoid-featured, but more accurately resemble the extra terrestrials commonly known as greys, but with more humanoid features given to them in their general structure including breasts on their females. Mouthless, the banshraes speak telepathically and are unable to sing or use wind instruments but are said to love them both and to be able to be pacified by them. Oddly, their description in the Monster Manuel still says they use blowguns for much of their attacking.

The banshrae first appeared in the third edition in Monster Manual V (2007). The banshrae appeared in the fourth edition Monster Manual (2008).[8]

Booka[edit]

The Booka (/ˈbkə/ BOO-kə)[9] is a winged faerie creature.

The booka first appeared in the original first edition Fiend Folio (1981).[10] The booka appeared in second edition for the Greyhawk setting in the Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix (1990).[11]

Brownie[edit]

The Brownie is a distant relative of the halfling that dwells in quiet, pastoral areas.

The brownie first appeared in the first edition in the original Monster Manual (1977).[12] The brownie appears in second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Volume One (1989),[13] and is reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[14] The brownie also appeared in DMR2 Creature Catalog (1993).[15] The brownie appeared in third edition in the article "Adventure Locales: The Silent Manse" on the Wizards of the Coast web site in 2004.[16]

The brownie has been expanded to be allowed as a playable race in a number of supplements and publications. One of the first was in the pages of White Dwarf. The brownie is detailed as a race for AD&D 1st Edition by Bob Lock in 1982.[17] The brownie appeared as an official player character class for the D&D basic game in Tall Tales of the Wee Folk (1989). The brownie would appear again as playable race for the D&D 3rd edition in Celtic Age from Avalanche Press.[18]

The brownie was written up as a player character race in White Dwarf #29 (Feb. 1982).[17] The brownie appeared in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[19] The brownie appears as a type of sprite in Dangerous Denizens: The Monsters of Tellene (2003), for the Kingdoms of Kalamar setting.[20] The brownie appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary 2 (2010), on page 49.[21]

Buckawn[edit]

Buckawn
Characteristics
Alignment Neutral
Publication history
Source books Monster Manual II
First appearance 1983

A buckawn is related to the brownie but is slender with dusky skin. A buckawn is less friendly but far more tricky than a brownie, but shuns human contact and does not regularly associate with brownies either. A buckawn is typically armed with a small dagger and quivers of darts which may be drugged or poisoned. Buckawn also have magical spell-like abilities.

It first appeared in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983).[22] It was listed in the second edition for the Greyhawk setting under the "brownie" heading in the Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix (1990).[23] It also appeared in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[24]

Dryad[edit]

Dryad are tree spirits with the forms of beautiful human or elven women made out of smooth, brown-green wood, and with grass and leaves for hair. They can step into and out of trees, and can perform localized teleportation by entering one tree and then magically appearing out of another nearby one.

The dryad was one of the first monsters introduced in the earliest edition of the game, in the Dungeons & Dragons "white box" set (1974), where they were described as beautiful tree sprites, each a part of their own respective tree.[25] The dryad appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977),[12] where it is described as a beautiful, alluring tree sprite always found near her oak tree. The dryad was detailed in Dragon #87 (July 1984), in the "Ecology of the Dryad".[26]

A new version of the dryad was included in the Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set (1981 & 1983).[27][28] The dryad appears as a player character class in Tall Tales of the Wee Folk in the "DM's booklet" (1989).[29] The dryad was also later featured in the Dungeons & Dragons Rules Cyclopedia (1991).[30] The dryad appears first in the Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[31] and is reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[4] The dryad appears in the Monster Manual for 3.0 (2000).[32] The dryad appeared again in the revised Monster Manual for 3.5. The dryad also appears in 4th edition. (2008).

Several variants of the Dryad have been published. The hamadryad appeared in Dragon #101 (September 1985). The hamadryad appeared again in Monstrous Compendium Forgotten Realms Appendix II (1991), and later in Monstrous Compendium Annual Volume Three (1996).[33] The mistling dryad template for the Eberron setting appeared in Forge of War (2007). The 4th edition included the briar witch dryad as another variant.[34]

Duskling[edit]

Dusklings are fey native to the Outer Planes.

Dusklings were introduced in the Magic of Incarnum.[35]

Faun[edit]

Faun
Characteristics
Alignment Neutral good
Image Wizards.com image
Publication history
First appearance Deities and Demigods (1980)
Mythological origins Faun

Fauns are closely related to satyrs and there is the possibility that they are the offspring of satyr-elf or satyr-human pairings. They are around 6 feet tall and have bestial faces. They have goat-like faces and flowing hair. They prefer body painting over clothing. They prefer to avoid combat. The faun appeared in the third edition Deities and Demigods (2002).[36]

Forlarren[edit]

A forlarren is a descendent of the offspring of a good nymph and the greater devil who enslaved her. A forlarren wanders alone, seeking vengeance on good and evil alike, as it detests its own existence in a limbo. A forlarren can cause metal to heat up so that characters touching it are burned. After it kills a character, it reveals its ambivalent nature by showing great remorse and offering its services for a period of time.

The forlarren first appeared in the original first edition Fiend Folio (1981).[10] The forlarren appeared in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[37] The forlarren appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary 2 (2010), on page 125.[21]

Frost Virago[edit]

The Frostwind Viragos is a faerie found in the coldest climates. They were originally introduced in Monster Manual V.

Grig[edit]

The grig is a mischievous and fun-loving sprite resembling cricket-centaurs. Grigs stand about 1½ feet tall and weigh about 1 pound, typical for a fey. grigs have no fear of larger creatures and delight in playing tricks. Grigs commonly carry with them fiddles, and they can play tunes on these that cause those that hear them to dance uncontrollably.

The grig first appeared in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983).[38] The grig appeared in the second edition for the Greyhawk setting in the Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix (1990) under the "sprite" entry,[11] and then in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[4] The grig appears in the third edition Monster Manual (2000), under the "sprite" entry,[39] and in the 3.5 revised Monster Manual (2003). The grig (sprite) appeared as a player character race in Savage Species (2003).

Hybsil[edit]

A hybsil is a small antelope-like creature that looks like a cross between a centaur and a pixie, brownie, or sprite. They use arrows coated with a rare plant juice that causes creatures to sleep for hours.

The hybsil first appeared in the fourth set of Monster Cards (1982). The hybsil also appeared in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983).[40] The hybsil appeared in second edition in the Ruins of Zhentil Keep boxed set (1995),[41] and in Monstrous Compendium Annual Volume Three (1996).[33] The hybsil appeared in third edition in Monsters of Faerûn (2001).[42]

Jermlaine[edit]

Jermlaine are evil and fiendish underground fey who spend their days sneaking, hiding and plotting. They resemble small, mishappen, grey-skinned humanoids covered with warts, pimples and hair, and have grumpy, big-nosed faces. They are very thin-limbed, and have slightly rat-like traits.

The jermlaine first appeared in the first edition adventure module Descent into the Depths of the Earth (1978),[43] and was later featured in the original Fiend Folio (1981) as the jermlaine (jinxkins).[44] The jermlaine appeared in second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[45] and appears in the Monstrous Manual (1993) under the "gremlin" entry. The jermlaine was further detailed in Dragon #262 (August 1999).[46] The jermlaine appeared in the third edition Monster Manual II (2002).[47]

Killmoulis[edit]

The killmoulis is the distant relative of the brownie, and is less than one foot in height but with a disproportionately large head and a prodigious nose. A killmoulis can blend into its surroundings, making it hard to see when hidden. A killmoulis will live in a symbiotic relationship with humans, making its home under the floors, and in the walls and crawlspaces. It is based on the folklore Kilmoulis.

The killmoulis first appeared in the original first edition Fiend Folio (1981).[10] The killmoulis appeared in second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[48] and appeared under the "brownie" entry in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[14]

Killoren[edit]

Killoren are a race of powerful fey creatures that blend nature's patience and power with the ambition and aggression of humanoid races. Killoren resemble half-elves. Killoren have green or tan skin with the texture of a soft, young leaf. Their limbs are unusually long and slender compared to those of the humanoid races. Killoren are bound to the raw forces of nature, manifesting this bond even in their physical form. The killoren have no organized kingdoms and maintain only a few scattered communities. Killoren are able to live comfortably in nearly any climate. Their homes blend in with the natural world around them.

The killoren first appeared in Races of the Wild (2005).[49]

Korred[edit]

A korred is a 3-foot tall creature that carries a cudgel, and can quickly weave its hair into animated entangling ropes and snares. The korred is a more chaotic relative of the satyr. A korred has great strength for its size, and its laugh causes creatures to be stunned. The korreds have a weekly holiday where they dance and play music, and anyone who tries to interrupt can be magically compelled to join the dance.

The korred first appeared in the fourth set of Monster Cards (1982). The korred also appeared in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983).[40] The korred was further detailed in Dragon #119 (March 1987), in "The Ecology of the Korred". The korred appeared in second edition in Monstrous Compendium Volume One (1989),[13] and in the Monstrous Manual (1993) under the satyr entry.[4]

Leprechaun[edit]

The leprechaun is a mischievous faerie creature, several variants have appeared in Dragon magazine.

The leprechaun was introduced to the game in The Strategic Review #3 (August 1975). The leprechaun appears in the first edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in the original Monster Manual.[50] The leprechaun appears in the Dungeons & Dragons supplement Tall Tales of the Wee Folk (1989) as a player character class. The leprechaun appeared in second edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in the Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[51] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[14] Leprechaun variants the geancannac and the far darrig appeared in Dragon #158 (June 1990), and the clurichaun and the wicked leprechaun appeared in Dragon #239 (September 1997).

Nereid[edit]

Nerieds are aquatic beings who inhabit the waves and are spiritually bound to the sea.

The nereid first appeared in the module The Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan (1980),[52] and later appears in Monster Manual II (1983).[53] The nereid appeared in the second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[54] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[55] The neried appeared in third edition in Stormwrack (2005).[56]

Nixie[edit]

Nixies resemble somewhat attractive humanoids with green skin and hair and webbed appendages. Nixies are goodly and peaceful creatures, but are shy, reclusive and suspicious. Nixies desire friendship, and have the ability to charm others to become their friend. Nixies love music, and make instruments from reeds on the banks of streams.

The nixie first appeared in the original Dungeons & Dragons set (1974).[25] The nixie appeared in first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in the original Monster Manual (1977).[57] The nixie appeared in the D&D Expert Set (1981, 1983) and the Dungeons & Dragons Rules Cyclopedia (1991).[30] The nixie appeared as a player character class in The Sea People (1990). The nixie appeared in second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in Monstrous Compendium Volume One (1989),[58] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993) under the "sprite" entry.[59] The nixie appeared in the third edition under the "sprite" entry in the Monster Manual (2000),[60] and in the 3.5 revised Monster Manual (2003). The nixie appeared as a player character race in Savage Species (2003).

Nymph[edit]

The nymph are fae that resemble elven women. They are based on the nymphs of Greek mythology.[61] Nymphs prefer secluded coves or sandy beaches, and are mostly solitary. Nymphs hate ugliness and evil.

The nymph first appeared in the original Blackmoor supplement (1975).[62] The nymph appeared in the first edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in the original Monster Manual (1977).[63] The nymph appeared in the second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Volume One (1989),[64] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[65][66] The grain nymph appeared for the Dragonlance setting in the Taladas: The Minotaurs set (1991).[citation needed] The nymph was further detailed in Dragon #240 (October 1997).[67] The grain nymph and the unseelie nymph appeared in Monstrous Compendium Annual Volume Four (1998).[68] The nymph appeared in the third edition Monster Manual (2000),[60] and in the 3.5 revised Monster Manual (2003). The nymph (apsara) appeared in Oriental Adventures (2001). The nymph appeared in the fourth edition in Monster Manual 3 (2010).

The nymph appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary (2009), on page 217.[69] It was also featured in the Futurama movie Bender's Game, the character Amy becomes a nymph in Bender's Dungeons & Dragons-based fantasy world.[70]

Ocean Strider[edit]

Ocean striders are humanoid orca-like beings who, as their name suggests, stride through shallow water in oceans and waterways and protect them from those who would plunder them for personal gain. The ocean strider appeared in the third edition Monster Manual II (2002).[47]

Oread[edit]

Oread
Characteristics
Alignment Chaotic Good
Image Wizards.com image
Publication history
First appearance Planes of Chaos (1994)
Mythological origins Oread

Oreads are stern and strong women with stony skin who protect mountains and have the essence of rock in their bodies. They wear gowns of metal and uncut gems. Oreads that have broken free of their mountain ties are known as snowhairs.

The oread and the snowhair first appeared in the second edition in the Planes of Chaos boxed set (1994).[71] The oread appeared the third edition Fiend Folio (2003).[1]

Pixie[edit]

Pixies are like tiny Dungeons & Dragon's elves, only with sneakier, less majestic faces, longer ears, and gossamer insect wings sprouting from their backs. They wear bright clothing, including caps and shoes with curled, pointed toes. However, pixies are normally invisible, even when attacking, and unless they choose to be visible, only others of their race can see them. Although goodly, pixies adore playing tricks and pranks. Some of their favorite pastimes include leading travellers astray, pinching skin black and blue, and stealing invaluable items.

The pixie first appeared in the Dungeons & Dragons "white box" set (1974).[25] The pixie appeared in the first edition of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in the original Monster Manual (1977).[72] The pixie appeared in the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set (1977, 1981, 1983) and the Dungeons & Dragons Rules Cyclopedia (1991). The pixie appeared as a player character class in Tall Tales of the Wee Folk (1989).[29] The pixie appeared in the second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[54] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993) under the "sprite" entry.[55] The pixie appears as a playable character race in The Complete Book of Humanoids (1993),[73] The pixie appeared in third edition under the "sprite" entry in the Monster Manual (2000),[60] and in the 3.5 revised Monster Manual (2003). The pixie appeared as a player character race in Savage Species (2003). The pixie appeared in fourth edition as a playable character race in Heroes of the Feywild.

The Complete Book of Humanoids allowed players to play pixies as player characters, and in his review of the book game designer Rick Swan asked "Who could pass up the chance to play a pixie?"[74]

Quickling[edit]

Main article: Quickling

The quickling is an evil creature said to have been brownies transformed by the evil power of the Queen of Air and Darkness.[75] The quickling has the ability to move and attack at extremely high speed.

The quickling first appears in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983).[38] The quickling appears in the Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix (1990),[23] and then appears in Monstrous Compendium Annual Volume Two (1995). It also appeared in the Tome of Horrors (2002)[76] by Necromancer Games. And also in Necromancer Games's Tome of Horrors Revised PDF (2005). The quickling appears in the Monster Manual for 4th edition (2008).[34]

Satyr[edit]

Satyrs are the children of a satyr and dryad union, while half-satyrs are the result of a satyr and human woman union[citation needed]. Satyrs have the legs and horns of a goat, but otherwise look human. They can play magical tunes on their pan pipes that cause varying effects as decided by the satyr. Satyrs are hedonistic creatures that frolic in the wild places of the world, and they dwell in temperate forests. Satyrs are extremely lustful, and will attempt to woo any human females they meet.

The satyr was introduced in the earliest edition of the game, in Supplement IV: Gods, Demi-gods & Heroes (1976).[77] The satyr appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977),[12] where it is described as a sylvan woodland inhabitant primarily interested in sport such as frolicking, piping, and chasing wood nymphs. The satyr and korred appear first in the Monstrous Compendium Volume One (1989),[78] and are reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[4] The satyr is further detailed in Dragon #155 (March 1990), in "The Ecology of the Satyr." [79] The satyr is detailed as a playable character race in The Complete Book of Humanoids (1993),[73] and is later presented as a playable character race again in Player's Option: Skills & Powers (1995).[80]

The satyr appears in the Monster Manual for the 3.0 edition.[32] Savage Species (2003) presented the satyr as both a race and a playable class.[81] The satyr appears in the revised Monster Manual for 3.5. The satyr appears in the Monster Manual for 4th edition,[34] and as a playable character race in the Heroes of the Feywild sourcebook (2011).[82]

In "Creature Competition: Battle Royal," a tournament determined by fan voting, a satyr assassin was eliminated 6th out of twelve creatures, beating a gelatinous cube, a vrock, a juggernaut, a zelekhut, and a 12-headed hydra.[83]

Shadar-kai[edit]

The shadar-kai are extraplanar human-like creatures that are listed as Fae. In the 3rd edition they come from the Plane of Shadow and are found in forests and the underground.[1] In the 4th Edition Monster Manual, shadar-kai originate from the Shadowfell. They typically have ashen skin, raven-black eyes, tattoos, scarifications, and piercings. Common hairstyles include long & loose, braids, and elaborately shaved heads. Shadar-kai can teleport, but return in an insubstantial form for a short period of time.[34]

The shadar-kai first appeared in the third edition Fiend Folio (2003).[1] The shadar-kai were further developed in Dragon #337 (November 2005), in "The Ecology of the Shadar-Kai". The shadar-kai appeared in the fourth edition Monster Manual (June 2008).[34] The shadar-kai also appeared in the Monster Manual 2

Sirine[edit]

Sirine
Characteristics
Alignment Chaotic Neutral
Image Wizards.com image
Publication history
Source books 3E Monster Manual 2, 1E Monster Manual 2, Tales of the Lance, City of Delights, Monstrous Manual
Mythological origins Siren

Sirines are playful, gregarious fey that dwell on sandy beaches, secluded coves and rocky islands. Sirines resemble highly attractive human women. They wear flowers in their hair and their ragged clothing typically leaves little to the imagination. Some sirines are blue-skinned.

The sirine first appeared in first edition in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[53] The sirine appeared in second edition for the Dragonlance setting in the Tales of the Lance set (1992),[84] and for the Al-Qadim setting in City of Delights (1993),[85] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[14] The sirine appears in the third edition Monster Manual II (2002).[86]

Spirit of the land[edit]

Spirit of the Land
Characteristics
Alignment True Neutral
Image Wizards.com image
Publication history
Source books Monster Manual II, Dark Sun (MC12)

Spirits of the land inhabit certain geographic areas, and lie in invisible dormancy until they feel the area they guard is threatened, in which case they rise to defend it. Originally appearing in the Dark Sun campaign setting, they have since been reintroduced to 3rd edition D&D, along with several other creatures from Dark Sun, in the Monster Manual II. Spirits of the land, in their natural form, are invisible and intangible. When it wishes to be seen it can manifest as a humanoid, animal, or elemental of its own size and composed of one particular element. The illustration of one in the Monster Manual II shows it in the form of a bear made out of wood and earth.

The spirit of the land first appeared in second edition for the Dark Sun setting in the Monstrous Compendium Dark Sun Appendix: Terrors of the Desert (1992). The spirit of the land appeared in the third edition Monster Manual II (2002).[86]

Spriggan[edit]

A spriggan is an ugly, dour cousin of the gnomes, which is found near isolated communities or in uninhabited areas, dwelling in burrows or ruins. A spriggan can become giant-sized to terrorize, rob, and otherwise work vile deeds. Spriggans hate only gnomes more than humankind, and associate only with their own ilk.

The spriggan appeared in Dragon #59 (March 1982). The spriggan appeared in the original first edition Monster Manual II (1983).[87] The spriggan appeared in second edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons for the Greyhawk setting under the "giant-kin" entry in the Monstrous Compendium Greyhawk Appendix (1990),[88] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[59] The spriggan appeared in the third edition Fiend Folio (2003).[89]

Sprite[edit]

The sprite dwells in meadows and wooded glens, and is shy and reclusive, and armed with arrows that put creatures to sleep.

The sprite first appeared in the first edition in the original Monster Manual (1977).[12] The sprite appeared in the D&D basic game in the Dungeons & Dragons Basic Set (1981, 1983).[90][91] The sprite appeared as a player character class in Tall Tales of the Wee Folk (1989). The sprite appears in second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Volume One (1989),[13] and is reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[14]

Sylph[edit]

A sylph is an outsider that shares many similarities to fey creatures. Sylphs are beautiful winged creatures similar to nymphs that dwell in aerial places.[12] They worship the deity Verenestra.[92]

The sylph first appeared in first edition in the original Monster Manual (1977), illustrated by David C. Sutherland III.[12] It also appeared in second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (1989),[48] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993) under the "elemental, air kin" entry[14] and in the third edition Monster Manual II (2002).[86]

Thorn[edit]

The thorn is a monstrous humanoid that is a nomadic, green-skinned hunter/rogue who dwells in cactus fields in the desert. The thorn appeared in third edition in the Monster Manual III (2004).[93]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Cagle, Eric, Jesse Decker, James Jacobs, Erik Mona, Matt Sernett, Chris Thomasson, and James Wyatt. Fiend Folio (Wizards of the Coast, 2003)
  2. ^ Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual II (TSR, 1983)
  3. ^ Breault, Mike, ed, et al. Greyhawk Monstrous Compendium Appendix (TSR, 1990)
  4. ^ a b c d e Stewart, Doug, ed. Monstrous Manual (TSR, 1994)
  5. ^ Green, Scott; Peterson, Clark (2002). Tome of Horrors. Necromancer Games. p. 12. ISBN 1-58846-112-2. 
  6. ^ Bulmahn, Jason (lead designer). Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary 3 (Paizo Publishing, 2011)
  7. ^ Hartsfield, Kim (2012). Castles & Crusades: Classic Monsters the Manual. Troll Lord Games. p. 14. ISBN 978-1-936822-06-5. 
  8. ^ Mearls, Mike, Stephen Schubert, and James Wyatt. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  9. ^ Mentzer, Frank. "Ay pronunseeAY shun gyd" Dragon #93 (TSR, 1985)
  10. ^ a b c Turnbull, Don, ed. Fiend Folio (TSR, 1981)
  11. ^ a b Breault, Mike, ed, et al. Greyhawk Monstrous Compendium Appendix (TSR, 1990)
  12. ^ a b c d e f Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual (TSR, 1977)
  13. ^ a b c Cook, David, et al. Monstrous Compendium Volume One (TSR, 1989)
  14. ^ a b c d e f Stewart, Doug, ed. Monstrous Manual (TSR, 1993)
  15. ^ Nephew, John. Creature Catalog (TSR, 1993)
  16. ^ Wizards of the Coast web site (Adventure Locales: The Silent Manse)
  17. ^ a b Lock, Bob (Feb–March 1982). "The Brownie". White Dwarf (Games Workshop) (29): 24. 
  18. ^ Phythyon, John R.; Soesbee, ee & Bennighof, Mike (2002). "Celtic Age: Role-Playing the Myths, Heroes & Monsters of the Celts" (1st ed.). Avalanche Press 
  19. ^ Green, Scott; Peterson, Clark (2002). Tome of Horrors. Necromancer Games. p. 30. ISBN 1-58846-112-2. 
  20. ^ Dangerous Denizens: The Monsters of Tellene. (Kenzer & Company, Wizards of the Coast, 2003)
  21. ^ a b Baur, Wolfgang, Jason Bulmahn, et al. Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Bestiary 2 (Paizo Publishing, 2010)
  22. ^ Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual II (TSR, 1983)
  23. ^ a b Breault, Mike, ed, et al. Greyhawk Monstrous Compendium Appendix (TSR, 1990)
  24. ^ Green, Scott; Peterson, Clark (2002). Tome of Horrors. Necromancer Games. pp. 30–31. ISBN 1-58846-112-2. 
  25. ^ a b c Gygax, Gary, and Dave Arneson. Dungeons & Dragons (3-Volume Set) (TSR, 1974)
  26. ^ Wilson, Shawn Vincent (writing as "Shaun Wilson"). "The Ecology of the Dryad." Dragon #87 (TSR, 1984)
  27. ^ Gygax, Gary, and Dave Arneson [1974], edited by Dave Cook. Dungeons & Dragons Expert Set (TSR, 1981)
  28. ^ Gygax, Gary, and Dave Arneson [1974], edited by Frank Mentzer. Dungeons & Dragons Set 2: Expert Rules (TSR, 1983)
  29. ^ a b Schick, Lawrence (1991). Heroic Worlds: A History and Guide to Role-Playing Games. Prometheus Books. p. 146. ISBN 0-87975-653-5. 
  30. ^ a b Allston, Aaron, Steven E. Schend, Jon Pickens, and Dori Watry. Dungeons & Dragons Rules Cyclopedia (TSR, 1991)
  31. ^ Cook, David, et al. Monstrous Compendium Volume Two (TSR, 1989)
  32. ^ a b Cook, Monte, Jonathan Tweet, and Skip Williams. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)
  33. ^ a b Pickens, Jon, ed. Monstrous Compendium Annual Volume Three (TSR, 1996)
  34. ^ a b c d e Mearls, Mike, Stephen Schubert, and James Wyatt. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
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