Shadyside Presbyterian Church

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Shadyside Presbyterian Church
ShadysidePresbyterianChurchPHLF.jpg
Shadyside Presbyterian Church
Shadyside Presbyterian Church is located in Pennsylvania
Shadyside Presbyterian Church
Location Amberson Ave. and Westminster Pl., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°26′57″N 79°56′21″W / 40.44917°N 79.93917°W / 40.44917; -79.93917Coordinates: 40°26′57″N 79°56′21″W / 40.44917°N 79.93917°W / 40.44917; -79.93917
Built 1889
Architect Shepley,Rutan & Coolidge
Architectural style Romanesque, Richardsonian Romanesque
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 75001613[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP April 03, 1975
Designated PHLF 1971[2]

Shadyside Presbyterian Church is a large congregation of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) in an historic part of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. Located at the corner of Amberson Avenue and Westminster Place in the Shadyside neighborhood, Shadyside Presbyterian Church was founded in 1866 as a congregation in the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. and has enjoyed a long history of local, national, and global recognition for its outreach and service.

The Shadyside church building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a prime example of Richardsonian Romanesque architecture. It was completed in 1890 to designs of American architectural firm Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, the successor firm to H.H. Richardson's own office.[3]

Between 2002 and 2012, the congregation had as its senior pastor, the Rev. Dr. M. Craig Barnes, noted author and speaker, and professor at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, until his election as president of Princeton Theological Seminary. It was here, in 1933 that the now global practice of celebrating World Communion Sunday on the first Sunday in October was originated. It also was the first church anywhere to pioneer regular radio broadcasts of its worship, on KDKA, the first commercially licensed radio station in the United States, and was the first church to broadcast worship to both the North Pole and to the South Pole.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ Historic Landmark Plaques 1968-2009. Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation. 2010. Retrieved 2011-07-28. 
  3. ^ "National Register of Historic Places - Nomination Form: Shadyside Presbyterian Church". 1967. Retrieved 2010-06-08. [dead link]

External links[edit]