Shah Wali

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شاہ ولی
Shahy Walli
Born 1952
Tagab, Kapisa, Afghanistan
Genres Ghazals
Classical music
Occupations Singer
Years active 1963–present
Labels Various

Ustad Shah Wali (Pashto: شاہ ولی) is a renowned musician from Afghanistan. He was born in 1952, in Tagab, Kapisa Province of Afghanistan.[1]

Shah Wali is an ethnic Pashtun[2] who has sung more than 300 songs in Pashto, Persian, and Urdu. His father was a businessman and had nothing to do with music. It was on his own account that Shah Wali carved a name for himself in this line.

Before his migration to Pakistan, Shah Wali had already sung more than 250 songs for Afghanistan Television. Once in Pakistan, he was taken in as a pupil by Ustad Nawab Ali Khan of the "House of Patiala" for 12 years and where he got an opportunity to learn from "King of Ghazal" Mehdi Hassan, Farida Khanam, and Nawab Shahabuddin Shahab, becoming by 1985 the leading Afghan singer in Pakistan.[3] At the conclusion of his training, he was conferred upon with the title of Ustad. His singing career started with his famous song "Shah Laila Rasha" for Afghanistan TV and the journey still goes on.

Personal life[edit]

Shah Wali has a wife and twelve children[citation needed]. Out of the twelve children, seven are boys and five are girls[citation needed]. Shah Wali along with his family now resides in Ontario, Canada[citation needed] and is actively involved with teaching music to a number of students.[citation needed]

Discography[edit]

  • Watan (وطن)
  • Songs of Love from Afghanistan (د مينې سندرې له افغانستان نه)
  • Nazawelay Laila (نازولې ليلا)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Naseer Storai (2007). Pashtana Honarmandaan. De Pashtoonkhwa De Pohanay Daira. p. 41. 
  2. ^ Appadurai, Arjun; Frank J. Korom; Margaret Ann Mills (1991). Gender, Genre, and Power in South Asian Expressive Traditions. University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 310. ISBN 978-0-8122-1337-9. 
  3. ^ Arnold, Alison (2000). The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. Taylor & Francis. p. 835. ISBN 978-0-8240-4946-1.