Sharafat

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This article is about the Hindi film. For the Palestinian village, see Sharafat, East Jerusalem.
Sharafat
Sharafat 1970 film poster.jpg
Film poster
Directed by Asit Sen
Produced by Madan Mohla
Screenplay by Nabendu Ghosh
Krishan Chander (dialogue)
Story by Mahesh Kaul
Starring Ashok Kumar
Dharmendra
Hema Malini
Music by Laxmikant-Pyarelal
Anand Bakshi (lyrics)
Cinematography Madan Sinha
Edited by Lachhmandass
Production
  company
Famous Cine Studios
Distributed by Seven Arts Films
Release date(s) 1970
Country India
Language Hindi

Sharafat is a 1970 Hindi film, directed by Asit Sen, starring Dharmendra, Hema Malini, Ashok Kumar, Sonia Sahni and Jagdeep. Hema Malini plays the role of a feisty courtesan Chanda in search of her father, in this satire about society's hypocritical moral standards.[1][2] The screenplay was written by Nabendu Ghosh, while the dialogues were by Hindi satirist Krishan Chander (author of such dark classics of Black Humor & Satire as Ek Gadhe Ki Maut (The Death Of A Donkey).

The film with music by Laxmikant-Pyarelal and lyrics by Anand Bakshi, was also noted for its mujra dance song, Sharafat Chhor Di sung by Lata Mangeshkar, which reached 9th position on the Binaca Geetmala annual list 1970

Cast[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

The film had music by Laxmikant-Pyarelal and lyrics by Anand Bakshi. The mujra (Courtesan dance) number, Zamaane Mein Sharifon Ka, Aji Woh Haal Dekha, Ke Sharaafat Chodd Di Maine... (trans.: "When I saw the way the righteous conduct themselves in this world, I gave up righteousness...") was a block-buster hit[citation needed] across the country and catapulted its box-office earnings.[citation needed]

# Title Singer(s)
1 "Sharifon Ka Zamane Men" Lata Mangeshkar
2 "Mera Rasta Rok Rahe Hai Yeh Parbat Anjane" Lata Mangeshkar
3 "Sharafat Chhod Di Maine" Lata Mangeshkar

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bhaichand Patel (ed.) (2012). Bollywood's Top 20: Superstars of Indian Cinema. Penguin Books India. p. 165. ISBN 0670085723. 
  2. ^ Thought, September 5, 1970, p. 20.

External links[edit]