Shatila refugee camp

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Coordinates: 33°51′46.26″N 35°29′54.17″E / 33.8628500°N 35.4983806°E / 33.8628500; 35.4983806

Life in Shatila
Shatila, 2003

The Shatila refugee camp (Arabic: مخيم شاتيلا‎), also known as the Chatila refugee camp, is a refugee camp, originally set-up for Palestinian refugees in 1949. It is located in southern Beirut, Lebanon and houses more than 9,842 registered Palestine refugees.[1] Since the eruption of the Syrian Civil War, the camp has become a destination for Syrian refugees, receiving mostly the poor Syrians, fleeing their country. As of 2014, the Shatila camp absorbed between 10,000 to 22,000 Syrian refugees,[2] effectively making them the majority population of the camp.

History[edit]

Establishment[edit]

Shatila was set up by the International Committee of the Red Cross to accommodate hundreds of refugees who came there after 1948.[1] They were from villages around the area of Amka, Majd al-Krum and Yajur in northern Palestine.[1]

During Lebanese Civil War[edit]

The Sabra and Shatila massacre was the slaughter of between 762 and 3,500 civilians, mostly Palestinians and Lebanese Shiites, by a Lebanese Christian militia in the Sabra neighborhood and Shatila from approximately 6:00 pm 16 September to 8:00 am 18 September 1982.[3]

During Syrian civil war[edit]

The camp comprises approximately one square kilometer and thus has an exceptionally high population density.[4]

School in the camp

UNRWA operates one health center and two primary schools within the camp. Non-governmental organizations active in the camp include Al-Najda, Beit Atfal Al-Soumoud, Norwegian Peoples' Aid, the Palestinian Red Crescent Society and the Association Najdeh.[5] Since the eruption of the Syrian Civil War in 2011, Lebanon's population has swelled by more than 1 million Syrian refugees. The Shatila camp has also become a destination for Syrian refugees, receiving mostly the poor Syrians. As of April 2014, the Shatila camp absorbed between 10,000 to 22,000 Syrian refugees,[6] effectively making them the majority population of the camp.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]