Shawn K. Centers

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Shawn K. Centers, DO, FACOP is an American osteopathic physician, pediatrician, herbalist, and integrative medicine specialist. Centers is a protégé and collaborator of Viola M. Frymann, DO. Frymann was an original student of William Garner Sutherland, the originator of cranial osteopathy. Frymann is credited with the development and application of osteopathic and craniosacral techniques in the pediatric age group. Centers worked alongside Frymann at the Osteopathic Center for Children for over twenty years.

Education[edit]

Centers trained in pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of New Jersey where he served as a pediatric chief resident. He attended osteopathic medical school at Nova Southeastern University in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida and received a Bachelor of Science degree from Georgetown College. Centers completed an Undergraduate Clinical and Teaching Fellowship in Osteopathic Medicine at Nova Southeastern University.[1]

Contributions[edit]

Centers is most noted for his development of innovative osteopathic and integrative medical techniques in children with complex medical problems, especially children with autism.[2] Dr. Centers studied herbal medicine under John R Christopher of Springville, Utah. Centers is additionally known for his mind body approaches in the treatment of adults and children. He has extensively studied the techniques of John Grinder, Richard Bandler, and Thad Everet James. Centers utilizes the Time Line Therapy techniques developed by Tad James, PhD in many of his treatment approaches. Centers is a Master Trainer of Neurolinguistic Programming and Time Therapy and was certified by Tad James PhD.[3]

Centers is the chief executive officer of the Frymann Institute and maintains an integrative medicine and full-time pediatric practice at the Osteopathic Center for Children in San Diego, California. Centers is also the founding president of the American Academy of Pediatric Osteopathy, a component society of the American Academy of Osteopathy.[4]

Background[edit]

Centers was born with a rare disorder known as Moebius Syndrome causing facial paralysis and credits cranial osteopathy and various alternative medicine techniques in overcoming health problems related to this disorder. He is a clinical professor of pediatrics and osteopathic medicine at a number of osteopathic medical schools in this country and abroad including Touro University, A.T. Still University, and the Osteopathic College of Bologna, Italy (CIO). Center was the lead author in the pediatrics chapter of Foundations of Osteopathic Medicine the most widely used osteopathic textbook.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.osteopathiccenter.org. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  2. ^ Osteopathy: A Philosophy and Methodology for the Effective Treatment of Children with Autism by Shawn K. Centers, DO, FACOP Autism Science Digest :Journal of AutismOne. 2011 Autism Science Digest
  3. ^ Info Page, www.drshawn.org. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  4. ^ http://www.do-peds.org/
  1. Lead Author, Foundations of Osteopathic Medicine Edition 3 byAmerican Osteopathic American Osteopathic Association, Michael Fitzgerald (Editor)
  2. Osteopathy: A Philosophy and Methodology for the Effective Treatment of Children with Autism by Shawn K. Centers, DO, FACOP Autism Science Digest :Journal of AutismOne. 2011 Autism Science Digest
  3. Chapter 59, Chapter 60, Cutting-Edge Therapies for Autism: Fully Updated Edition Skyhorse Publishing; 1st edition.
  4. Bio Page, www.osteopathiccenter.org. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  5. Info Page, www.drshawn.org. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  6. http://www.autismone.org/content/osteopathy-philosophy-and-methodology-effective-treatment-children-autism-shawn-k-centers-do. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  7. http://www.autismone.org/content/living-energy-essential-oils-and-autism. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  8. http://www.autismone.org/content/osteopathy-and-seizures. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  9. http://www.do-peds.org/ Retrieved 23 October 2013.