Sheffield Hallam (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 53°21′18″N 1°31′23″W / 53.355°N 1.523°W / 53.355; -1.523

Sheffield, Hallam
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Sheffield, Hallam in South Yorkshire.
Outline map
Location of South Yorkshire within England.
County South Yorkshire
Population 84,912[1]
Electorate 70,032 (December 2010)
Current constituency
Created 1885
Member of Parliament Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat)
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency Yorkshire and the Humber

Sheffield Hallam is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2005 by Nick Clegg, leader of the Liberal Democrats and Deputy Prime Minister.[n 2]

Constituency profile[edit]

Sheffield Hallam is the only constituency in South Yorkshire that is not a Labour stronghold. It has never returned a Labour MP since its first election in 1885 and, apart from a brief period between 1916 and 1918, was held by the Conservatives from 1885 until 1997, when the Liberal Democrats won it. This long period of Conservative dominance included all 3 elections under Margaret Thatcher's premiership, starkly contrasting with the consensus within most seats in the county and the other county which Sheffield Hallam borders, Derbyshire.

On income-based 2004 statistics this is the most affluent constituency one place below the top ten seats of the 650, which were spread across the South-East of England (including London), with almost 12% of residents earning over £60,000 a year.[2] This measure placed Sheffield Hallam above Windsor and Twickenham.

The 2001 Census showed Hallam to have the highest number of people classified as professionals of any of the UK constituencies.[3] Furthermore, 60% of working age residents hold a degree,[4] 7th highest and exceeding Cambridge.[n 3]

In a 2013 survey by The Campaign to End Child Poverty, Sheffield Hallam was found to be the constituency with the lowest level of child poverty in the UK, at under 5%.[5]

Until the 1997 general election, the constituency was a safe Conservative seat. It has been represented in the House of Commons since May 2005 by Nick Clegg, who has been leader of the Liberal Democrats since December 2007 and Deputy Prime Minister since May 2010. He won his seat in Parliament for the first time at the 2005 general election. In a county division in which all other seats have at times been substantial wins for the Labour Party, this is currently the only seat not held by Labour. This is also the only existing constituency never to have been won by Labour in South Yorkshire.

Hallam constituency extends from Stannington and Loxley in the north to Dore in the south and includes small parts of the city centre in the east. It includes the wards of Crookes, Dore and Totley, Ecclesall, Fulwood and Stannington.

The large majority of Hallam is rural, spreading in the west into the Peak District National Park. It also contains some of the least deprived wards in the country, has low unemployment (1.5% jobseekers claimants in November 2012)[6] and a high rate of owner occupancy with few occupants who rent their home.[7] Since the 2010 boundary changes, neither of Sheffield's universities have a campus in the constituency[8] but it still includes areas where many students live.[citation needed]

Boundaries[edit]

Hallam[n 4] borders High Peak, North East Derbyshire, Sheffield Central, Sheffield Heeley and Sheffield Brightside and Hillsborough.

Historical boundaries

From 1983 to 1997, Sheffield Hallam consisted of five electoral wards of the City of Sheffield: Broomhill; Dore; Ecclesall; Hallam; and Nether Edge.[9] In 1997, Nether Edge ward was transferred to the safe Labour seat of Sheffield Central.

Current boundaries

The Boundary Commission's final recommendations for boundary reform which Parliament accepted before the 2010 election proposed that Hallam lose Broomhill to Sheffield Central and gain Stannington from Sheffield Hillsborough[10] which followed changes in 1997 such that the seat has electoral wards:

  • Crookes; Dore and Totley; Ecclesall; Fulwood; and Stannington in the City of Sheffield

History[edit]

Prior to its creation Hallam was a part of the larger Sheffield Borough constituency, which was represented by two Members of Parliament (MPs). In 1885 the Redistribution of Seats Act, which sought to eliminate constituencies with more than one MP and for the first time allow approximately equal representation of the people, led to the break-up of the constituency into five divisions: each represented by a single MP, as today. Hallam was one of these new divisions. Its first MP, the Conservative Charles Stuart-Wortley, had previously been an MP in the Sheffield constituency, elected for the first time in 1880.

Hallam was regarded in 2004 as the wealthiest constituency in the north of England[11] and was long held by the Conservative Party. At the 1997 general election Richard Allan of the Liberal Democrats took the seat with an 18.5% swing.

Members of Parliament[edit]

The current Member of Parliament is Nick Clegg, the leader of the Liberal Democrats and Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He won the seat after the outgoing LibDem MP Richard Allan stood down at the 2005 general election. After Sir Menzies Campbell's resignation in October 2007 as leader of the Liberal Democrats, Clegg contested the resulting leadership election and was elected leader on 18 December 2007.

Election Member Party Subsequent Parliamentary Roles
1885 Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley Conservative Baron Stuart of Wortley
1916 by-election H. A. L. Fisher Liberal
1918 Douglas Vickers Conservative
1922 Frederick Sykes[n 5] Conservative MP for Nottingham Central (1940–45)
1928 by-election Louis William Smith Conservative
1939 by-election Roland Jennings Conservative (contesting elections as a "Conservative and Liberal")
1959 John Osborn Conservative
1987 Irvine Patnick Conservative
1997 Richard Allan Liberal Democrat Baron Allan of Hallam
2005 Nick Clegg Liberal Democrat Deputy Prime Minister, 2010–Present

Elections[edit]

Election results for Sheffield Hallam

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2015: Chingford and Woodford Green
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
National Health Action Naveen Judah

The 2010 election in Sheffield Hallam was marked by insufficient provision in the Ranmoor polling station, leading to long queues and voters being turned away when polls closed at 10 pm.[12]

General Election 2010: Sheffield Hallam[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Democrat Nick Clegg 27,324 53.4 +2.3
Conservative Nicola Bates 12,040 23.5 -6.6
Labour Jack Scott 8,228 16.1 -1.7
UKIP Nigel James 1,195 2.3 +1.0
Green Steve Barnard 919 1.8 -0.8
English Democrats David Wildgoose 586 1.1 N/A
Independent Martin Fitzpatrick 429 0.8 N/A
Christian Ray Green 250 0.5 N/A
Monster Raving Loony Mark Adshead 164 0.3 N/A
Majority 15,284 29.9 +8.5
Turnout 51,135 73.7 +11.5
Liberal Democrat hold Swing +6.9

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

[n 6]
General Election 2005: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Democrat Nick Clegg 20,710 51.1 −4.3
Conservative Spencer Pitfield 12,028 29.7 −1.3
Labour Mahroof Hussain 5,110 12.6 +0.2
Green Rob Cole 1,331 3.3 N/A
Christian Peoples Sidney Cordle 441 1.1 N/A
UKIP Nigel James 438 1.1 0.0
BNP Ian Senior 369 0.9 N/A
Majority 8,682 21.4 −3.0
Turnout 40,527 62.2 −2.6
Liberal Democrat hold Swing
General Election 2001: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Democrat Richard Allan 21,203 55.4 +4.1
Conservative John Paul Harthman 11,856 31.0 −2.1
Labour Miss Gillian Furniss 4,758 12.4 −1.1
UKIP Leslie George Arnott 429 1.1 N/A
Majority 9,347 24.4 +6.2
Turnout 38,246 64.8 −7.5
Liberal Democrat hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997:[n 7] Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Democrat Richard Allan 23,345 51.3 +18.2
Conservative Irvine Patnick 15,074 33.1 −12.4
Labour Stephen G. Conquest 6,147 13.5 −6.6
Referendum Party Ian S. Davidson 788 1.7 N/A
Independent Philip Booler 125 0.3 N/A
Majority 8,271 18.2 N/A
Turnout 45,479 72.4 +1.6
Liberal Democrat gain from Conservative Swing 15.3
General Election 1992: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Irvine Patnick 24,693 45.5 −0.8
Liberal Democrat Peter J. Gold 17,952 33.1 +0.6
Labour Veronica M. Hardstaff 10,930 20.1 −0.3
Green Mallen Baker 473 0.9 +0.1
Natural Law Richard E. Hurtford 101 0.2 N/A
Revolutionary Communist Ms. Thresea M. Clifford 99 0.2 N/A
Majority 6,741 12.4 −1.4
Turnout 54,248 70.8 −3.9
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Irvine Patnick[n 8] 25,649 46.3 −4.3
Liberal Peter J.Gold 18,012 32.5 +4.1
Labour Mukesh C. Savani 11,290 20.4 +0.7
Green Ms. Leela M. Spencer 459 0.8 N/A
Majority 7,637 13.8 −2.4
Turnout 55,410 74.7 +1.9
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1983: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 26,851 50.6 −4.3
Liberal Malcolm S. Johnson 15,077 28.4 +12.7
Labour Ms. Jean McCrindle 10,463 19.7 −9.1
Independent Conservative Philip Booler 656 1.2 N/A
Majority 11,774 22.2 −3.9
Turnout 53,047 72.8 +0.3
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 31,436 54.9 +5.9
Labour Mike Bower 16,502 28.8 −0.2
Liberal Kenneth Salt 8,982 15.7 −6.3
National Front G. F. Smith 300 0.5 N/A
Majority 14,934 26.1 +6.1
Turnout 57,220 72.5 +2.7
Conservative hold Swing
General Election October 1974: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 26,083 49.0 +0.1
Labour Clive Betts[n 9] 15,419 29.0 +1.8
Liberal Malcolm Johnson 11,724 22.0 −1.9
Majority 10,664 20.0 −1.8
Turnout 53226 68.8 −8.4
Conservative hold Swing
General election of February 1974[n 10]
General Election February 1974: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 29,062 48.9 −12.4
Labour David Blunkett[n 11] 16,149 27.2 −4.2
Liberal Malcolm Johnson 14,160 23.9 +16.6
Majority 12,913 21.8 −8.1
Turnout 59,371 77.2 +7.4
Conservative hold Swing
General election of 1970
General Election 1970: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 25,134 61.3
Labour Alan Broadley 12,884 31.4
Liberal Preetam Singh 2,972 7.3
Majority 12,250 29.9
Turnout 40,990 69.8
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 21,593 51.3
Labour Peter Hardy 13,663 32.5
Liberal Denis Lloyd 6,799 16.2
Majority 7,930 18.9
Turnout 75.0
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1964: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 23,719 55.0
Labour Arthur Kingscott 11,635 27.0
Liberal George Manley 7,807 18.1
Majority 12,084 28.0
Turnout 74.1
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General Election 1959: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative John Osborn 28,747 62.8
Labour Solomon Sachs 11,938 26.1
Liberal Bernard Roseby 5,119 11.2
Majority 16,809 36.7
Turnout 76.1
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1955: Sheffield Hallam[n 12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Roland Jennings 30,069 66.2
Labour James Marsden 15,330 33.8
Majority 14,739 32.5
Turnout 74.1
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1951: Sheffield Hallam[n 13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Roland Jennings 29,016 70.8
Labour Frederick Beaton 11,988 29.2
Majority 17,028 41.5
Turnout 82.0
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1950: Sheffield Hallam[n 14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Roland Jennings 28,159 65.1
Labour H. C. Spears 11,444 26.5
Liberal A. E. Jones 3,641 8.4
Majority 16,715 38.6
Turnout 86.4
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1945: Sheffield Hallam[n 15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Roland Jennings 15,874 47.1
Labour John Frederick Drabble 13,009 38.5
Liberal Gerald Abrahams 2,614 7.7
Communist Gordon Cree 2,253 6.7
Majority 2,865 8.6
Turnout 75.7
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

Sheffield Hallam by-election, 1939[n 16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Roland Jennings 16,033 61.7
Labour C. S. Darvill 9,939 38.3
Majority 6,094 23.4
Turnout 57.8
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1935: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Louis William Smith 21,298 67.3
Labour Grace Colman 10,346 32.7
Majority 10,952 34.6
Turnout 71.7
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1931: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Louis William Smith 26,857 77.5
Labour Henry George McGhee 7,807 22.5
Majority 19,050 55.0
Turnout 80.3
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General Election 1929

Electorate 42,422

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Louis William Smith 18,920 60.9
Labour Basil Rawson 12,133 39.1
Majority 6,787 21.8
Turnout 73.2
Conservative hold Swing
Sheffield Hallam by-election, 1928[n 17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Louis William Smith 9,417 53.7
Labour Charles Flynn 5,393 30.8
Liberal Joseph Burton Hobman 2,715 15.5
Majority 4,024 22.9
Turnout 54.7
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1924: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Frederick Sykes 15,446 63.7
Labour E. Snelgrove 8,807 36.3
Majority 6,639 27.4
Turnout 77.8
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1923: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Frederick Sykes 12,119 57.7
Labour Arnold Freeman 5,506 23.9
Liberal Cuthbert Snowbale Rewcastle 5,383 23.4
Majority 6,613 28.8
Turnout 75.0
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1922: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Frederick Sykes 13,405 59.4
Liberal Cuthbert Snowbale Rewcastle 9,173 40.6
Majority 4,232 18.8
Turnout 73.7
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

General election of December 1918
General Election 1918: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Douglas Vickers Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing N/A
1916 by-election

This followed the resignation of Charles Stuart-Wortley on 16 December. Herbert Fisher of the Liberal Party was elected unopposed, becoming Hallam's first non-Conservative MP.

Sheffield Hallam by-election, 1916
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Herbert Fisher Unopposed N/A N/A
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Arthur Neal
General Election December 1910: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley 5,788 50.9
Liberal Arthur Neal 5,593 49.1
Majority 195 1.8
Turnout 84.1
Conservative hold Swing
General Election January 1910: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley 6,181 50.9
Liberal Arthur Neal 5,965 49.1
Majority 216 1.8
Turnout 89.8
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

General election of 1906
General Election 1906: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley 5,546 50.4
Liberal A. Grant 5,465 49.6
Majority 81 0.8
Turnout 85.0
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1900: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

General Election 1895: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General Election 1892: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley 4,057 54.3
Liberal Robert Hammond 3,414 45.7
Majority 643 8.6
Turnout 87.3
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

General election of 1886
General Election 1886: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley 3,581 57.8
Liberal T. R. Threlfall 2,612 42.2
Majority 969 15.6
Turnout 78.9
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1885: Sheffield Hallam
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Beilby Stuart-Wortley 3,764 54.4
Liberal Charles Warren 3,155 45.6
Majority 609 8.8
Turnout 88.2
Conservative hold Swing

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. ^ Also above Cities of London and Westminster and Hammersmith and Fulham.
  4. ^ The constituency should not be confused with the former Hallamshire constituency.
  5. ^ Knighted in 1928 and appointed Governor of Bombay
  6. ^ Richard Allan stood down at the 2005 general election. His replacement as the Liberal Democrat candidate, Nick Clegg, held the seat with a slightly reduced majority. Although voter turnout was again down to 62.2%, this was the highest turnout in Sheffield.
  7. ^ At the 1997 general election the seat saw an unprecedented 18.2% one-party swing from the other parties, particularly the large Conservative vote, towards the Liberal Democrat winning candidate.
  8. ^ After 28 years as MP for the seat, John Osborn stood down at the 1987 general election. His replacement as the Conservative Party candidate, local businessman Irvine Patnick, held the seat for the Conservatives with a slightly reduced majority.
  9. ^ Clive Betts, the losing Labour candidate at the October 1974 general election, won the Sheffield Attercliffe seat in 1992.
  10. ^ The constituency boundaries were redrawn prior to the February 1974 general election, perhaps accounting for the reduced majority of the incumbent, John Osborn.
  11. ^ David Blunkett, the losing February 1974 Labour candidate, won the Sheffield Brightside seat in 1987 enabling his later positions in government as Secretary of State (1997-2005).
  12. ^ "Conservative and Liberal"
  13. ^ "Conservative and Liberal"
  14. ^ "Conservative and Liberal"
  15. ^ "Conservative and Liberal"
  16. ^ "Conservative and Liberal"
  17. ^ The 1928 by-election followed the resignation of Frederick Sykes on June 26 to take up an appointment as Governor of Bombay.
References

External sources[edit]