Sheffield Hallam University

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Sheffield Hallam University
SHU crest.jpg
Motto Learn and Serve
Established 1843 (Founded)
1992 (University status)
Type Public
Endowment £550,000 (2011)[1]
Chancellor Lord Winston
Vice-Chancellor Philip Jones
Academic staff 4,170[2]
Students 37,066[3]
Undergraduates 28,409[3]
Postgraduates 8,657[3]
Location Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England
53°22′45″N 1°27′53″W / 53.379105°N 1.464706°W / 53.379105; -1.464706Coordinates: 53°22′45″N 1°27′53″W / 53.379105°N 1.464706°W / 53.379105; -1.464706
Campus City campus and Collegiate crescent campus
Former names Sheffield Polytechnic
Sheffield City Polytechnic
Colours
                           
Affiliations University Alliance
Association of Commonwealth Universities
Website www.shu.ac.uk
Logo of Sheffield Hallam University
Owen Building

Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) is a university in South Yorkshire, England, based on two sites in Sheffield. City Campus is located in the city centre, close to Sheffield railway station, and Collegiate Crescent Campus is about two miles away, adjacent to Ecclesall Road in south-west Sheffield.

The university is the third largest in the UK, with more than 37,000 students (of whom over 4,000 are international students), 4,170 staff and 747 courses.

History[edit]

1843: the Sheffield School of Design was founded by Nicholas Hallam, and for over a century it was one of Britain’s top schools of art and design.

1905: the City of Sheffield Training College (later Sheffield City College of Education) on Collegiate Crescent admitted its first 90 students.[4]

1967: the Owen Building was constructed.[5] Built in a functional 1960s design, it has since been modernised and renovated.[6]

1969: the Sheffield School of Design merged with the city’s College of Technology to form Sheffield Polytechnic.

1976: this institution absorbed the city’s two teacher training colleges and was renamed Sheffield City Polytechnic. In 1987 it became a founding member of the Northern Consortium.

1992: Sheffield City Polytechnic became Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), with the right to award its own degrees.

2005: SHU was reorganised into four faculties. The new Faculty of Development and Society, brought together education, geography, humanities, law, and social sciences. At the same time, with the intention of further developing research and teaching in the new Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, a new Clinical Academic Group was launched. The building that had been designed and constructed to house the National Centre for Popular Music became the university's students' union building (the HUBS). The former students' union building, the Nelson Mandela Building, was sold and has since been demolished. In 2007 SHU took over the teaching of nursing and midwifery from the University of Sheffield. These activities are now based at the Collegiate Crescent Campus.

2008: the Psalter Lane campus (formerly the Sheffield College of Art) was closed, and the activities transferred to the City Campus. The site has been sold and redeveloped for housing. The £26 million energy-efficient Cantor Building (named in recognition of a major donor to the university) opened in September. The building, which includes teaching spaces and an art gallery has been described as "the impressive new entry point to the campus".[7]

Organisation and governance[edit]

Faculties[edit]

SHU's Owen Building (left) and Stoddart Building (right), part of the City Campus on Arundel Gate
SHU's Student Union: Hallam Union

SHU is divided into four faculties:

  • Faculty of Arts, Computing, Engineering and Sciences (ACES):

Art & Design; Business Systems & IT; Communication & Media; Computers & Computing; Engineering & Technology; Mathematics & Statistics; and Multimedia & the Internet.

  • Faculty of Development and Society (D&S):

Architecture & Planning; Built Environment; Education; English; Geography & Environmental Science; Humanities; Law & Community Justice; Social Sciences, Performing Arts.

  • Faculty of Health and Wellbeing (HWB):

Biosciences; Diagnostic Radiography; Nursing & Midwifery; Occupational Therapy; Operating Department Practitioners; Paramedic Studies; Physiotherapy; Radiotherapy & Oncology; Social Work; and Sport.

  • Sheffield Business School (SBS):

Business & Management; Facilities Management; Finance; Food & Nutrition; Language & Culture; and Tourism, Hospitality & Events Management.

Research centres[edit]

SHU has 30 research centres, including the following:

  • Art & Design Research Centre
  • Biomedical Research Centre
  • Centre for Education and Inclusion Research
  • Centre for Health and Social Care Research
  • Centre for Professional and Organisational Development
  • Centre for Regional Economic & Social Research
  • Centre for Science Education
  • Centre for Sport and Exercise Science
  • Centre for Sustainable Consumption
  • Centre for Tourism, Leisure and Environmental Change
  • Culture, Communication and Computing Research Institute
  • Facilities Management Graduate Centre
  • Materials and Engineering Research Institute
  • Sport Industry Research Centre

Chancellor[edit]

Life peer and fertility expert Lord Winston was installed as Chancellor of SHU in a ceremony at the Millennium Galleries on Friday 5 October 2001.[citation needed] Winston has a long history in academia, being a full-time faculty member at Imperial College London for the majority of his career.

Academic profile[edit]

Lifelong Learning Network[edit]

What If? Poem on the side of Owen Building

SHU is the lead partner for Higher Futures, the Lifelong Learning Network (LLN) for South Yorkshire, North Derbyshire and North Nottinghamshire.

Rankings and reputation[edit]

In the National Student Survey, several subject areas at SHU have performed very well in terms of overall student satisfaction with their courses: architecture and geography were placed first, and planning and housing studies was placed second.[8]

In the 2013 university league tables, Sheffield Hallam University was placed 83rd out of 120 UK universities by The Guardian,[9] 68th by The Independent, 69th by The Times and 64th by The Sunday Times.

Adsetts Learning Centre

Notable alumni[edit]

Entrance to Sheffield Hallam University at night
Collegiate Crescent campus

Notable staff[edit]

  • Geoff Cartwright, senior lecturer in Environmental Conservation 1995-2012: joint winner of the 2011 Individual award in the Sheffield Telegraph's Environment Awards for his work on the development of a nature reserve at Blackburn Meadows on the site of the former Tinsley sewage farm.[10]
  • I.M. Dharmadasa, applied physicist and researcher of low cost solar cells
  • Marina Lewycka (1946- ), senior lecturer in Media Studies 1998-2012, author of several novels including A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian (2005)
  • Cameron Maxfield, senior lecturer in Metalwork and Jewellery 1968–2003: artist, metalworker, silversmith, and 2008 winner of the National Metalwork Design Award for his piece Tea Bag Pot
  • F.B. Pickering, metallurgist
  • Jane Rogers, winner of the 2012 Arthur C Clarke Award for the 'best science fiction novel of the year'
  • John Tyme (1926–2008), senior lecturer in Environmental Studies 1968–1976, environmentalist, anti-motorway campaigner, and author of Motorways Versus Democracy (Macmillan, 1978)
  • Dave Wickett (1947-2012), lecturer in Economics, given a lifetime achievement award by the House of Commons all-party parliamentary beer group.[11]
  • Mike Wild (1939– ), senior lecturer in Environmental Studies 1969–1997, founder of the Five Weirs Walk group; co-founder of the Sheffield Wildlife Trust; and 2010 winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award in the Sheffield Telegraph's Environment Awards [12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]