Shellharbour Hospital

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Shellharbour Hospital
South Eastern Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service
Geography
Location Mount Warrigal, NSW, Australia
Coordinates 34°33.5′S 150°50.5′E / 34.5583°S 150.8417°E / -34.5583; 150.8417Coordinates: 34°33.5′S 150°50.5′E / 34.5583°S 150.8417°E / -34.5583; 150.8417
Organisation
Care system Public Medicare (AU)
Hospital type District
Affiliated university University of New South Wales, University of Wollongong
Services
Emergency department Yes
Beds 80
History
Founded 1986
Links
Website www.sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au/Shellharbour_Hospital/
Lists Hospitals in Australia

Shellharbour Hospital is a major district hospital located in the Shellharbour area of New South Wales. It is part of the Southern network of the South Eastern Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service, and receives students from the University of New South Wales and University of Wollongong.

Services[edit]

Shellharbour Hospital provides medical, surgical, obstetric, emergency and psychiatry services to the Shoalhaven and northern Illawarra region, operating 75 beds and a five bed high dependency unit.[1] It also operates a satellite dialysis unit, and is also a leading provider of gynaecological and laparoscopic surgery in the Southern region. In the year 2006-7 there were over 15,000 admissions provided by 273 full-time equivalent staff.[2]

A new 20-bed mental health unit intended as a step-down service that provides rehabilitation for patients discharged from acute care services is currently under construction.[3] Also being built is an adolescent mental health unit. The centre for referral of complex cases from Shellharbour is Wollongong Hospital.[1] The hospital receives students from the University of New South Wales,[4] and in 2008 a formal agreement was signed with the University of Wollongong graduate medical school.[5]

History[edit]

Shellharbour Hospital opened in 1986 by Neville Wran, after many years of lobbying and at a cost of A$22 million.[6] The hospital provided medical and surgical services, and paediatric and maternity services were transferred to it from nearby Port Kembla Hospital.[7] As the population of the area grew, the volume of services provided steadily increased and placed pressure on hospital services; in 2006, physician Chris Dunn said the hospital was under-resourced and there was a "staffing crisis."[8]

In 2007 the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) revoked the hospital's accreditation for employing and teaching basic physician trainees due to inadequate supervision, as there were not enough senior staff employed.[5] The hospital submitted a request to regain its status in 2008,[9] and the RACP restored its training role for 12 months. 2008 also saw the opening of a new home birthing service and family care centre.[10] The South Eastern Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service has proposed to consolidate surgical services from nearby Bulli Hospital to Shellharbour from 2009.[11]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b East Coast Medical Network. "East Coast Medical Network 2007". Retrieved 2008-04-25. 
  2. ^ South Eastern Sydney and Illawarra Area Health Service. "Annual Report 2006-7". Retrieved 2008-04-25. 
  3. ^ "Work begins on Shellharbour Hospital mental health unit". ABC. May 23, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-24. 
  4. ^ UNSW. "Handbook". Retrieved 2008-04-25. 
  5. ^ a b "Accreditation not linked to patient care: Meagher". ABC. February 6, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-24. 
  6. ^ Rosamond, Simone (September 1, 2007). "Not so happy 21 years". Illawarra Mercury. 
  7. ^ Trenwith, Courtney (May 11, 2007). "Fond memories for nurses". Illawarra Mercury. 
  8. ^ Dunlevy, Gabriel (September 2, 2006). "Shellharbour hospital's many unhappy returns". Illawarra Mercury. 
  9. ^ "Shellharbour Hospital may get teaching accreditation reinstated". ABC. March 13, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-24. 
  10. ^ "Shellharbour Hospital gets new home birth service". ABC. June 13, 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-03. 
  11. ^ "Della Bosca asked to explain surgery closure". ABC. October 27, 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-27. 

External links[edit]