Shenandoah University

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Shenandoah University
Shenandoah university vertical logo.jpg
Motto Curiosity Required
Established 1875
Type Private
Religious affiliation United Methodist Church
Endowment US $54.9 million[1]
President Tracy Fitzsimmons
Undergraduates 1,767[2]
Location Winchester, Virginia 22601, United States
Campus Small city
Former names - Shenandoah Seminary (founding in 1875-1925)
- Shenandoah College (1925-1991)
- Shenandoah Conservatory (separate institution 1937-1974)
Colors red and blue          
Nickname The Hornets
Website su.edu

Introduction[edit]

The SU statue on the main campus of Shenandoah University during spring.

Shenandoah University is a comprehensive private liberal arts university located in Winchester, Virginia in the United States. It has an enrollment of approximately 4,000 students across more than 90 programs in seven schools: College of Arts & Sciences, Harry F. Byrd, Jr. School of Business, Shenandoah Conservatory, Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy, Eleanor Wade Custer School of Nursing, School of Health Professions (Athletic Training, Respiratory Care, Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant Studies and Physical Therapy) and the School of Education & Human Development. Shenandoah University is one of five United Methodist Church-affiliated institutions of higher education in the Commonwealth of Virginia.[3]

The U.S. News and World Report's Inaugural Best Colleges for Veterans listing places Shenandoah University at #6 among regional universities in the South. [4]

Shenandoah University was featured as one of the 322 most environmentally responsible colleges in the U.S. and Canada, according to The Princeton Review. The university earned a green rating of 90, and it was profiled in the fourth annual edition of the free downloadable book, “The Princeton Review’s Guide to 322 Green Colleges."[5]

History[edit]

The university was founded as Shenandoah Seminary in 1875 in Dayton, Virginia, by Dr. Abraham Funkhouser and Professor Jay Fries. Shenandoah Seminary became a junior college in 1924, changing its name to Shenandoah College the following year. Shenandoah Conservatory became a separate corporation in 1937 and began granting four-year degrees. In 1960, Shenandoah College and the Shenandoah Conservatory moved to the current 126-acre Winchester campus and began offering four-year degrees in 1974 (at which time the college and conservatory corporations were merged). Shenandoah obtained university status on January 1, 1991, and today the student body represents 43 states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The student body and faculty combined represent 73 countries. Ninety-one percent of full-time faculty have an earned doctorate (Ph.D. or similar) in their fields or a terminal degree.

Locations[edit]

A view toward the Brandt Student Center during spring.

The university operates on six campuses:

  • Main Campus
  • East Campus Commons
  • Downtown Campus
  • Medical Campus
  • Shenandoah River Campus at Cool Spring Battlefield
  • Northern Virginia Campus

The Main Campus is located in Winchester near Interstate 81, and the Medical Campus located near the Winchester Medical Center. The Northern Virginia Campus in Ashburn, Va., has two locations: the Northern Virginia Campus Ashmill Building, located along Route 7, is home to undergraduate nursing programs, as well as graduate programs in education/leadership, occupational therapy, physical therapy and physician assistant studies. The Northern Virginia Campus at George Washington University (GWU) is the location for doctoral-level programs in pharmacy. There are also a number of satellite offices and facilities located throughout Winchester.

In 2013, Shenandoah University accepted stewardship of 195 acres of land along the Shenandoah River, now known as the Shenandoah River Campus at Cool Spring Battlefield. Purchased by the Civil War Trust in 2012, stewardship of the property transferred to the university in spring 2013 to ensure protection and preservation of the former battlefield site. The property now serves as an outdoor classroom and living laboratory for the university community and the general public.

Schools and programs[edit]

The Ohrstrom-Bryant Theatre (main campus), 1998.

Shenandoah offers more than 90 programs of study at the bachelor's-, master's-, and doctoral-degree levels in seven schools. Undergraduate and graduate certificate programs are also available.

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Harry F. Byrd, Jr. School of Business
  • Shenandoah Conservatory
  • Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy
  • Eleanor Wade Custer School of Nursing
  • School of Health Professions
  • School of Education & Human Development

Shenandoah’s Harry F. Byrd, Jr. School of Business earned initial accreditation of its business programs in 2007, from AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, and reaccreditation was earned with flying colors in 2012.[6] Only 655 business schools worldwide hold AACSB accreditation.

In 2012, during the nursing program’s 50-year anniversary celebration, Shenandoah’s Division of Nursing was officially named the Eleanor Wade Custer School of Nursing. Kathryn Ganske, Ph.D., RN, was appointed dean of the school.

Athletics[edit]

Coach rallying the Shenandoah Men's Football team.

The university's Department of Athletics sponsors 21 intercollegiate sports, 10 for men and 11 for women. Shenandoah's men's and women's teams are known as the Hornets.

The men's sports are:
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Tennis
  • Track and Field (indoor)
  • Track and Field (outdoor)
  • Soccer
The women's sports are:
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Field hockey
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track and field (indoor & outdoor)
  • Volleyball

All teams compete as members of the Division III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the department holds membership in the Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC). Shenandoah University formerly competed in the USA South Athletic Conference (USA South).

In the spring of 2008, the women's softball team captured its first-ever USA South Athletic Conference championship in school history, finishing with a record of 30-12 (15-3 in conference).

The men’s baseball team played in four straight regionals from 2009-12, and the Division III national championships in 2009 and 2010.

In the fall of 2011, the women's soccer team won the USA South Conference Championship for the first time in school history. The team also played in the first round of the NCAA tournament for the first time.

A newly constructed part of Shenandoah University's campus called Sarah's Glen where students can relax and study.

Campus expansion[edit]

In 2012, Shenandoah completed numerous construction and renovation projects across campus, including upgrades to residence halls, renovations to the Wilkins Administration Building and the construction of Sarah’s Glen, a 2.5 acre landscape and pavilion project in honor of the late Sarah Brandt, daughter of Trustee Bill Brandt and his wife, Elaine. Sarah’s Glen features a beautifully designed garden with signature oval lawn, pavilion and labyrinth. The area serves as a performance venue, outdoor classroom, events location, gathering spot and memorial garden.

In August 2013, Shenandoah broke ground on the newest addition to its Winchester Campus: the 55,000-square-foot Health & Life Sciences Building. When completed and open in fall 2014, the HLSB will be home to Shenandoah’s Eleanor Wade Custer School of Nursing, as well as athletic training, biology, chemistry and respiratory care programs. and pre-health programs. Featuring state-of-the-art laboratories, flexible classrooms and meetings spaces, the new building will also serve as a place where students, faculty and staff can meet, study and learn together.

Partnership relations[edit]

Shenandoah University has agreements with many international colleges and universities, and also participates in the British Council's Business Education Initiative and Irish-American Scholars program in conjunction with universities and colleges in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom.

Recent graduates celebrating.

Notable alumni[edit]

Technology[edit]

Shenandoah University’s iMLearning program makes available computing technology for faculty and students. All incoming freshmen and full-time students receive a MacBook Pro laptop and their choice of an iPad or iPad mini.

Shenandoah’s Pharmacogenomics and Music Production & Recording Technology (MPRT) programs were renewed as Apple Distinguished Programs. Shenandoah’s two academic programs were renewed for 2013-15, a recognition first achieved in 2011. [7]

Name[edit]

According to the university's official history page, the name Shenandoah is derived from the Native American legend of Zynodoa, a brave whose life of strength and courage and his appreciation of beauty resulted in having a river and a valley named for him. Popular myth further ascribes translation of the word "Shenandoah" to mean "daughter of the stars."[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°9′58.1″N 78°9′34.3″W / 39.166139°N 78.159528°W / 39.166139; -78.159528