Shenyang Metro

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Shenyang Metro
Shenyang Metro Corporation logo.png
Overview
Locale Shenyang, China
Transit type Rapid transit
Number of lines 2
Number of stations 43
Daily ridership 533,000 (Nov 2012 Daily Avg.)[1]
794,625 (Peak record set on Dec 24, 2012)[2]
Operation
Began operation 27 September 2010
(Trials 2009)
Technical
System length 55.16 km (34.27 mi)[3]
System map

Shenyang Metro Map.png

Shenyang Metro
Simplified Chinese
Traditional Chinese

Shenyang Metro is a metro system in the city of Shenyang, Liaoning province in China. This is the 7th operating subway system in Mainland China and the first in Northeast China.

Network[edit]

The Shenyang Metro consists of Line 1 (East-West), operational with 27.8 km and 22 stations, and Line 2 (North-South), which has been officially opened to the public on 9 January 2012. Line 1 opened on 27 September 2010.

The construction of the first line, Line 1, started on November 18, 2005. Trial service not open to the public started in September 2009, with the line fully opened in September 2010.[4] Construction of a four-station extension east to Dongling Park started in 2009. The total cost of Line 1 will be 8.88 billion yuan (1.1 billion US dollars).

The construction on Line 2 started on November 18, 2006. Line 2 is a 19.3-kilometre (12.0 mi) long north to south line with 19 stations and opened on January 9, 2012.[5]

Line Terminals
(District)
Opened Newest
Extension
Length
km
Stations
Line 1 Shisanhaojie
(Tiexi)
Limingguangchang
(Dadong)
2009 2010 27.8 22
Line 2 Hangkonghangtiandaxue
(Shenbei)
Quanyunlu
(Dongling)
2012 2013 27.36 22
Total 55.16 43

History[edit]

Shenyang metro, Qingnian dajie station

Shenyang was one of the first Chinese cities with a metro plan. The initial plan of building a metro line in Shenyang was proposed as early as 1940, when a Japanese company planned a 52-kilometre (32 mi) metro network.[6] The metro program was revived again in 1965, when the Chinese government decided that the four biggest cities at that time, Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, and Shenyang should build metro systems for military reasons. However, due to the Cultural Revolution, only the Beijing subway and Tianjin subway were built. While the Shanghai subway system was put into service in 1995, because of the economy decline in Shenyang during the 1980s–1990s, Shenyang's subway program was postponed again. A light rail system was designed in the early 1990s as a cheaper alternative, however this plan was also abandoned. When the city's economy revived after 2000, the metro dream rematerialized. Finally in 2005, the subway proposal was approved by the Chinese central government and the construction work began.[7]

  • September 23, 2009: Line 1, Shisanhao Jie to Tiexi Square (12 stations), non-passenger trial service
  • September 27, 2009, Shenyang-Tiecheng intercity railway starts construction.[8]
  • September 27, 2010: Line 1, Shisanhao Jie to Liming Square (22 stations), full opening
  • October 19, 2010: Line 1 eastern extension started construction.[9]
  • December 30, 2011: Line 2 starts trial operation.[10]
  • January 9, 2012: Line 2, Santaizi to Quanyun Jie (19 stations) full opening

Under Construction[edit]

Extensions of both ends of both lines are currently under construction along with an intercity metro line.

Planned Open Date Route Name Terminals Length(km) Stations
2013 Line 2[11] northern extension Putianlu Santaizi 10.6 7
Shenyang–Tieling Intercity Railway[12][13] Puhedadao Fanhexincheng 48
2014-2018 Line 2[11] northern extension Shenyangxinbeizhan Putianlu 2
Line 1[14] eastern extension Mulu Tanglingongyuan 8 4
Line 1[14] Monorail Tanglingongyuan Wangbin 21.95 7
Line 2[15] south extension 16.5 7

Shenyang is also building a 65 km, 4 line tram network.[16][17]

Future plan[edit]

Plans for two east-west lines, two north-south lines, a loop line, and two branches with a total length of 182.5 kilometres (113.4 mi) have been expanded to eleven lines.[18] Currently there are 3 lines being planned in the near-term in preparation for construction. All 3 of them shall be complete by 2018. The original loop line is broken into 2 "L" shaped lines that intersect twice to form a loop. Line 4 will start construction in 2014.[19]

Route Name Terminals Length(km) Stations
Line 4[20] Southwest to northeast line Zhu Er Tun New Shenyang South Station 32 23
Line 9[19] Southern and western portion of the loop Tawan Street Ximiaozi 36 29
Line 10[21] Northern and eastern portion of the loop Dingxiang Lake Park Sujiatun 50 32

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://liaoning.nen.com.cn/system/2012/11/29/010145780.shtml
  2. ^ http://auto.china.com.cn/industry/20121225/461604.shtml
  3. ^ Sina:沈阳地铁一号线通车跨进地铁时代(组图)
  4. ^ "Shenyang metro Line 1 fully operational". Railway Gazette. October 1, 2010. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Shenyang metro opens second line". Railway Gazette. January 24, 2010. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  6. ^ Shenyang subway net
  7. ^ metro construction plan for Shenyang ratified
  8. ^ "沈阳至铁岭城际铁路开工建设". 沈阳市交通局. 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 
  9. ^ "沈阳地铁一号线东延线昨开工建设". 时代商报. 2010-10-20. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 
  10. ^ 王晓婷 (2011-12-30). "沈阳地铁二号线今日开通 市民可持试乘票免费乘车". 沈阳晚报. Retrieved 2012-02-23. 
  11. ^ a b 沈阳新北站在道义郝心台村 将成经济中心
  12. ^ http://city.finance.sina.com.cn/city/2009-07-28/114372.html
  13. ^ http://www.ln.xinhuanet.com/xwzx/2009-07/24/content_17198317.htm
  14. ^ a b "沈阳地铁一号线东延线开建". Shenyang Metro. Retrieved 2012-11-22. 
  15. ^ 沈阳至辽阳城际铁路开工勘察 地铁将能直达机场
  16. ^ "Shenyang tram network construction begins". Railway Gazette. Railway Gazette. 21 February 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-16. 
  17. ^ "北车投资48.6亿建设沈阳浑南新区有轨电车". www.zacliu.com. www.zacliu.com. 21 February 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-16. 
  18. ^ "Shenyang Metro - Railway Technology". Railway Technology. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  19. ^ a b "沈阳城市轨道交通建设规划获得国家发改委正式批复". 辽宁日报. 2012-06-20. Retrieved 2012-06-29. 
  20. ^ "地铁四号线公布23个暂定站点". 辽沈晚报. 2012-06-28. Retrieved 2012-06-29. 
  21. ^ "沈阳地铁四、九、十号线获国务院批复 九、十号线11月开建". 辽沈晚报. 2012-06-20. Retrieved 2012-06-29. 

External links[edit]