Sheraton Hotels and Resorts

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Sheraton Hotels and Resorts
Type Hotel
Industry Hospitality, hotels, tourism
Founded 1937 in Springfield, Massachusetts
Founder(s) Ernest Henderson
Robert Moore
Number of locations 400+ (Worldwide)[1]
Products Temporary residence
Employees 145,000[1]
Parent Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide
Website sheraton.com

Sheraton Hotels and Resorts is Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide's largest and third oldest brand (St. Regis being the oldest and Westin second oldest).

History[edit]

The origins of the brand date back to 1937 when Ernest Henderson and Robert Moore acquired the Stonehaven Hotel in Springfield, Massachusetts. The chain got its name from another early hotel that the pair had acquired, which had a lighted sign on the roof saying "Sheraton Hotel" which was large and heavy and therefore too expensive to change. Instead, they decided to call all their hotels by that name.[2]

Henderson and Moore had opened three hotels in Boston by 1939, continuing with their rapid expansion opening properties along the entire East Coast. In 1945, it was the first hotel chain to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

In 1949 Sheraton expanded internationally with the purchase of two Canadian hotel chains. In 1956, Sheraton purchased the Eppley Hotel Company, which was then the largest privately held hotel business in the United States, for $30 million.[3] Three years later, in 1959 it purchased the four hotels owned by the Matson Lines in Honolulu, Hawaii, its first hotels outside North America. The 1960s saw the first Sheraton hotels outside the US and Canada with the opening of the Tel Aviv-Sheraton in Israel in February 1961 and the Macuto-Sheraton outside Caracas, Venezuela, in 1963. By 1965, the 100th Sheraton Motor Inn had opened its doors. The multinational conglomerate ITT purchased the chain in 1968, after which it was known as ITT Sheraton. In 1985, Sheraton became the first western company to operate a hotel in the People's Republic of China, assuming management of the state-built Great Wall Hotel in Beijing, which became the Great Wall Sheraton.

In 1994, ITT Sheraton purchased a controlling interest in the Italian CIGA chain, the Compagnia Italiana Grandi Alberghi, or Italian Grand Hotels Company, which had been seized from its previous owner, the Aga Khan, by its creditors. The chain had begun by operating hotels in Italy, but over-expanded across Europe just as a recession hit.[4] These hotels formed the core of what came to be the ITT Sheraton Luxury group, later Starwood's Luxury Collection.

In April 1995, Sheraton introduced a new, mid-scale hotel brand Four Points by Sheraton Hotels, to replace the designation of certain hotels as Sheraton Inns. In 1998, Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. acquired ITT Sheraton, outbidding Hilton. Under Starwood's leadership, Sheraton has begun renovating many existing hotels and expanding the brand's footprint.

From 2003 until 2013, Sheraton sponsored the Hawaii Bowl.

On March 12, 2005, a gunman carrying a 9mm Beretta handgun, later identified as Terry Ratzmann, fired 22 rounds into a Living Church of God congregation at a Sheraton Hotel in Brookfield, Wisconsin, killing the minister and six others, including the minister's son. Four others were wounded, one critically. Ratzmann shot and killed himself midway through the second out of three magazines. The incident focused national attention on the teachings and legacy of Herbert W. Armstrong, the Worldwide Church of God and LCG's leader Roderick C. Meredith[5] and the police investigated religious issues as potential motives for the shooting, though no official conclusion has been reached.[6]

Specific hotels[edit]

In the 1940s, Sheraton purchased the famous Hotel Kimball of Springfield, Massachusetts, and transformed the 4-star hotel into The Sheraton-Kimball Hotel, attracting guests like President John F. Kennedy.[7]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sheraton Hotels and Resorts", Meetings & Events
  2. ^ "Running to Cover". Time. July 13, 1962. Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  3. ^ http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,866996,00.html
  4. ^ Adam Zagorin (June 7, 1993). "How the Aga Khan Stumbled". Time. Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  5. ^ Banerjee, Neela. "Rampage Puts Spotlight on a Church Community". NYTimes Online. The New York Times. Retrieved 24 January 2012. 
  6. ^ "Motive Still Unclear in Milwaukee Church Shooting". Associated Press. The New York Times. Retrieved 24 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "Sheraton Kimball Hotel", cardcow.com

External links[edit]