Sherman Oaks, Los Angeles

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Sherman Oaks
Neighborhoods of Los Angeles
The Citibank (l) and City National Bank (r) Buildings in Sherman Oaks
The Citibank (l) and City National Bank (r) Buildings in Sherman Oaks
Nickname(s): The Village at Sherman Oaks
Sherman Oaks is located in San Fernando Valley
Sherman Oaks
Sherman Oaks
Location within Los Angeles/San Fernando Valley
Coordinates: 34°09′04″N 118°26′54″W / 34.15111°N 118.44833°W / 34.15111; -118.44833Coordinates: 34°09′04″N 118°26′54″W / 34.15111°N 118.44833°W / 34.15111; -118.44833
Website www.villageatshermanoaks.com

Sherman Oaks is an affluent neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley region of the city of Los Angeles, California. It has two city parks and a senior center. The neighborhood includes eight public and seven private schools. The main commercial pedestrian-friendly shopping district was established in 1999 and is known as "The Village at Sherman Oaks." This unique shopping district is the heart of the commercial area. The Village at Sherman Oaks is located along Ventura Boulevard between Van Nuys Boulevard and Cedros Avenue. It continues along Van Nuys Boulevard between Ventura Boulevard and Hortense Avenue.

History[edit]

A partner of the Los Angeles Suburban Homes Company, Gen. Moses Hazeltine Sherman, developed Sherman Oaks. The company had subdivided 1,000 acres (400 ha) of land that would become Sherman Oaks. In 1927 each acre was sold for $780.[1]

In 1991 Marvin Braude, a member of the Los Angeles City Council, redesignated a 45-block area from being a part of Van Nuys to being a part of Sherman Oaks.[2] This redesignated area included the community of Magnolia Woods.[3] Some area residents had presented a petition and several original deeds that stated "Sherman Oaks" to Braude. They argued that the area was originally a part of Sherman Oaks until the 1960s, when ZIP codes labeling the area as Van Nuys were established.[2]

The 1994 Northridge earthquake caused damages in the surrounding area. The Community Redevelopment Agency sought to manage the rebuilding efforts. The homeowners in the Sherman Oaks area filed a lawsuit to prevent the agency from managing efforts, and the lawsuit went in the favor of the homeowners.[1]

Geography[edit]

In contrast to much of the Valley, the area is relatively urbanized, with commercial skyscrapers along Ventura Boulevard as well as scattered throughout. In addition, residential densities are highly mixed, with apartment and condominium neighborhoods alongside single-story residential ones. The area is a local hub for regional transportation, business, and shopping.[citation needed]

Nearby places[edit]

Relation of Sherman Oaks to nearby places, not necessarily contiguous:[4][5]

Population[edit]

Van Nuys Boulevard at Ventura Boulevard, Sherman Oaks
La Reina Theatre, although closed, still stands on Ventura Boulevard. Parts of the space have been converted for retail use. The area surrounding La Reina is known as The Village at Sherman Oaks.[6]

2010[edit]

As of the 2010 census, according to the San Fernando Valley Almanac, Sherman Oaks had a population of 52,677 people and 25,255 households. The racial makeup of the neighborhood was 82% non-Hispanic white, 5% Asian American and 3% African-American; 11% were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Other races made up less than 1%.[citation needed]

2000[edit]

The Los Angeles Times reported that the 2000 U.S. census counted 61,166 residents in the 9.15-square-mile Sherman Oaks neighborhood, including a wide swath of the Santa Monica Mountains—or 6,687 people per square mile, among the lowest population densities for the city. In 2008, the city estimated that the resident population had increased to 65,436.[7]

In 2000, the percentages of residents aged 19 to 49 and 65 and older were among the county's highest.[7]

The neighborhood was considered "not especially diverse" ethnically within Los Angeles, with a high percentage of white residents. The breakdown was whites, 73.8%; Latinos, 11.8%; Asians, 5.7%; blacks, 4.4%; and others, 4.4%. Iran (14,1%) and Mexico (8.8%) were the most common places of birth for the 26.2% of the residents who were born abroad—an average percentage for Los Angeles.[7]

The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $69,651, considered high for the city. The percentage of households that earned $125,000 and up was high for Los Angeles County. The average household size of two people was low when compared to the rest of the city and the county. Renters occupied 58.9% of the housing stock and house- or apartment-owners held 41.1%.[7] The median single-family housing value as of August 2009 was $575,000.[8]

The percentages of divorced residents and of widows were among the county's highest.[7]

Government and infrastructure[edit]

Local government[edit]

Los Angeles Fire Department operates Station 88 Sherman Oaks and Station 102 South Van Nuys/Valley Glen in Sherman Oaks.[9][10] In addition the department operates Fire Station 78, which serves Sherman Oaks, in Studio City.[11]

The Los Angeles Police Department operates the nearby Van Nuys Community Police Station at 6240 Sylmar Avenue, 91401, serving the community.[12]

County, state, and federal representation[edit]

The United States Postal Service Sherman Oaks Post Office is located at 14900 Magnolia Boulevard.[13]

Politics[edit]

Richard Close, the president of the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Association (SOHA), stated that, as paraphrased by Dinah Eng of the Los Angeles Times, in 1978 Sherman Oaks "played a key role in the drive for Proposition 13" and in 2002 "was the epicenter of the ill-fated San Fernando Valley secession movement".[1]

Education[edit]

Van Nuys Middle School
Sherman Oaks Elementary School
Notre Dame High School

Forty-five percent of Sherman Oaks residents aged 25 and older had earned a four-year degree by 2000, a high percentage for both the city and the county. The percentage of those residents with a master's degree or higher was also high for the county.[7]

Schools within the Sherman Oaks boundaries are:[14]

Public[edit]

  • Van Nuys Middle School, LAUSD, 5435 Vesper Avenue
    • Van Nuys Middle was in the Van Nuys community until 1991 when its area was moved into Sherman Oaks. The school continued to use the name "Van Nuys Middle" despite the move.[2]
  • Kester Avenue Elementary School, LAUSD, 5353 Kester Avenue
  • Community Harvest Charter, high school, 5300 Sepulveda Boulevard
  • Chandler Elementary School, LAUSD, 14030 Weddington Street
  • Robert A. Millikan Middle School, LAUSD, 5041 Sunnyslope Avenue
  • Sherman Oaks Elementary, LAUSD, 14755 Greenleaf Street
  • Dixie Canyon Avenue Elementary, LAUSD, 4220 Dixie Canyon Avenue
  • Riverside Drive Elementary School, LAUSD, 13061 Riverside Drive

Portions of Sherman Oaks, including Magnolia Woods, are zoned to Van Nuys High School in Van Nuys.[3] Other portions are zoned to Grant High School in Valley Glen.[1]

Scott Glover of the Los Angeles Times stated in 1993 "many Sherman Oaks residents do not have school-age children, and many others send their children to private schools".[15]

Private[edit]

  • Village Glen School, K–12, 13130 Burbank Boulevard
  • ABC Little School, elementary, 14926 Burbank Boulevard
  • Emek Hebrew Academy Teichman Family Torah Center, elementary, 15365 Magnolia Boulevard
  • Notre Dame High School, 13645 Riverside Drive. A co-ed Catholic college preparatory high school, it was founded by the Congregation of Holy Cross in 1947 as an all-boy school, but it became a co-educational school in the 1983-1984 school year.
  • St. Frances De Sales, elementary, 13368 Valleyheart Drive
  • Emerson Academy for Arts and Sciences, 12749 Ventura Boulevard
  • The Buckley School, K–12, 3900 Stansbury Avenue, the oldest co-educational independent day school in the Los Angeles area.

Libraries[edit]

Los Angeles Public Library operates the Sherman Oaks Branch.[16]

Parks and recreation[edit]

The Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Park is in Sherman Oaks. Dinah Eng of the Los Angeles Times wrote in 2002 that the park "is a popular site for family gatherings."[1] The park has an auditorium, two lighted baseball diamonds, six unlighted baseball diamonds, lighted indoor basketball courts, lighted outdoor basketball courts, a children's play area, a 60 person community room, a lighted American football field, an indoor gymnasium without weights, picnic tables, a lighted soccer (football) field, and lighted tennis courts.[17] Located in the same place as the park, the Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Pool is a seasonal outdoor heated swimming pool.[18]

The Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Senior Citizen Center (also known as Bernardi Center), also on the park grounds, has an auditorium and multi-purpose room; its banquet capacity is 200 and its assembly capacity is 300. The senior center also has two community/meeting rooms; one can hold 50 people and one can hold 30 people. The senior center has two kitchens, a play area, a shuffle board place, a stage, and two storage rooms.[19] The Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Tennis Courts facility in the Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Park has eight courts.[20]

In addition the city operates the Sherman Oaks Castle Park, with arcade, batting cages, and miniature golf facilities, in Sherman Oaks.[21]

Notable people[edit]

A number of celebrities live or have been seen in Sherman Oaks.[22] Some of the residents or past residents are:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Valley Girl reputation, community activist at heart." Los Angeles Times. May 22, 2005. Retrieved on March 23, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c Stewart, Jocelyn Y. "Identity Crisis : Community: The decision to change the name of a 45-block area of Van Nuys to Sherman Oaks leaves junior high in an odd position." Los Angeles Times. August 23, 1991. Retrieved on March 23, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Sarkisian-Miller, Nora. "A hideaway in Sherman Oaks." Los Angeles Times. May 7, 2006. Retrieved on March 23, 2014.
  4. ^ [1] Colored map, Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  5. ^ [2] Bing maps
  6. ^ "La Reina Theatre". Cinema Treasures. Retrieved January 24, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f [3] "Sherman Oaks," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  8. ^ "Sherman Oaks average and median listing prices". Trulia.com. Retrieved January 24, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Fire Station 88." Los Angeles Fire Department. Retrieved on May 5, 2009.
  10. ^ "Fire Station 102." Los Angeles Fire Department. Retrieved on May 5, 2009.
  11. ^ "Fire Station 78." Los Angeles Fire Department. Retrieved on May 5, 2009.
  12. ^ "Van Nuys Community Police Station." Los Angeles Police Department. Retrieved on May 5, 2009.
  13. ^ "Post Office Location – SHERMAN OAKS." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on December 6, 2008.
  14. ^ [4] "Sherman Oaks: Schools", Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  15. ^ Glover, Scott. "SHERMAN OAKS : Meeting Will Focus on Future of Schools." Los Angeles. June 15, 1993. Retrieved on March 23, 2014.
  16. ^ "Sherman Oaks Branch Library." Los Angeles Public Library. Retrieved on March 19, 2010.
  17. ^ "Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Park." City of Los Angeles. Retrieved on March 19, 2010.
  18. ^ "Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Pool." City of Los Angeles. Retrieved on March 19, 2010.
  19. ^ "Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Senior Citizen Center." City of Los Angeles. Retrieved on March 19, 2010.
  20. ^ "Van Nuys Sherman Oaks Tennis Courts." City of Los Angeles. Retrieved on March 19, 2010.
  21. ^ "Sherman Oaks Castle Park." City of Los Angeles. Retrieved on March 19, 2010.
  22. ^ [5] StarSightings.com
  23. ^ "Baba Ali Biography". Alistandup. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  24. ^ Shane Dawson (May 23, 2011). "BEST PROM EVER!". ShaneDawsonTV. YouTube. Retrieved May 23, 2011. 
  25. ^ "Obituary: Charles E. Puskar / Force behind creation of SIDS of Pennsylvania". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 25 April 2009. 
  26. ^ http://www.lamag.com/culture/lastory/story.aspx?ID=1771942
  27. ^ Ashley Baylen (April 20, 2012). "Top 50 Hottest Jewish Men (10–1)". Shalom Life. Retrieved 2013-04-22. 
  28. ^ Dovey, Rachel. "Joseph Gordon-Levitt: Hollywood's Boy Wonder Grows Up", Paste, 11 October 2010.
  29. ^ "Brian Grazer Biography". Yahoo. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  30. ^ "Episode4 FanMail". Paul London. YouTube. 2010-07-11. Retrieved 2010-08-15. [dead link]
  31. ^ "Let's Discuss Demi Lovato's New Digs". Realestalker.blogspot.com. November 10, 2010. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  32. ^ "Demi Lovato Treats Family to a Home – on Her Birthday". Teen Hollywood. August 21, 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2013. 
  33. ^ Lauren Beale. "Actress/model Bridget Marquardt buys in Sherman Oaks" Los Angeles Times August 22, 2009
  34. ^ "Olsen Twins Dad Broke - Dakota Fanning Sports Wish from Mom and Dad". National Ledger. June 27, 2010. Retrieved July 5, 2010. 
  35. ^ Ken Ellingwood & Richard Winton (1997-02-17). "Drawing Flak but Not Retreating; Politics: Pasadena Mayor William Paparian has taken on crusades all his public life. Although he gets plenty of criticism, he is unapologetic about his stands". Los Angeles Times. 
  36. ^ Obituary Variety, March 4, 1991.
  37. ^ http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/contributor/1800019593/bio retrieved 2007-07-30
  38. ^ Los Angeles Daily News, May 10, 2003
  39. ^ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2105098/Paula-Abduls-California-mansion-market-1-9-million.html

External links[edit]