Sherwood Smith

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Sherwood Smith
Born 1951
Occupation author, retired teacher
Nationality United States
Genre fantasy, science fiction, historical romance

Sherwood Smith (born 1951) is an American fantasy and science fiction writer for young adults as well as adults. Smith is a Nebula Award finalist and a longtime writing group organizer and participant.

Smith's works include the YA novel Crown Duel. Smith also collaborated with Dave Trowbridge in writing the Exordium series and with Andre Norton in writing two of the books in the Solar Queen universe.

In 2001, her short story "Mom and Dad at the Home Front" was a finalist for the Nebula Award for Best Short Story. Smith's children's books have made it on many library Best Books lists. Her Wren's War was an Anne Spencer Lindbergh Honor Book,[1] and it and The Spy Princess were Mythopoeic Fantasy Award finalists.[2]

Biography[edit]

Sherwood Smith was born in 1951.[2] On her website, Smith describes herself as a middle-aged woman who has been married for over thirty years. Besides writing, she taught part-time at a K-8 school. She has "two kids, rescue dogs, and a house full of books."[3]

Smith began making books out of taped paper towels when she was five years old.[2] When she was 8, she started writing about another world, Sartorias-deles, though she soon switched to making comic books of her stories, which she found to be easier. Although she first tried to send out her novels when she was 13, nothing sold. However, some of the novels Smith first wrote as a teen, including Wren to the Rescue, were sold after she learned to rewrite.[3]

In the years it took her to learn to rewrite, Smith "went to college, lived in Europe, came back to get [her] masters in History, worked in Hollywood, got married, started a family and became a teacher."[3] In 2010 she became a member of Book View Cafe.

Smith currently resides in California.[2]

Partial bibliography[edit]

Books written under other pseudonyms[edit]

Smith has written some of the books in the Planet Builders series as Robyn Tallis. She has also written four books in the Nowhere High series as Jesse Maguire and one book in the Horror High series as Nicholas Adams.[4]

Novels[edit]

Wren Books[edit]

Sartorias-deles[edit]

Sartorias-deles is the name of the fictitious world that is the setting for many of the books by Sherwood Smith. It is one of four inhabited planets in the Erhal system.[5] According to Smith, humans first arrived on Sartorias-deles through world gates untold millennia ago. Occasionally, still more humans arrive. However, in non-canon commentaries the author informs readers that most of the early human history on Sartorias-deles has been lost since the so-called Fall of Sartor approximately 4,000 years before the events of the books such as Senrid.[5] Smith does indeed appear to intend these humans be portrayed as having been Terrans prior to their immigration to the Erhal system. For example, in numerous references throughout the stories, they appear to have brought with them several domesticated animal species, including cattle, horses, and dogs, as well as many foods such as coffee, rice, the tomato,[6] and concepts such as the seven-day week.[7]

Other:

Exordium[edit]

Andre Norton's Solar Queen Universe[edit]

Andre Norton's Time Traders Universe[edit]

Oz Series[edit]

TV tie-in Novels[edit]

Short stories[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Previous Winners". The Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh Foundation. Archived from the original on April 11, 2007. Retrieved September 10, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Sherwood Smith". Fantastic Fiction. 
  3. ^ a b c "Frequently Asked Questions". Sherwood Smith's Website. 
  4. ^ "Featured Review: The Crown and Court Duet". SF Site. 
  5. ^ a b "Sartorias-deles: The Underlying Concept". Official Sherwood Smith Site. 
  6. ^ Wren to the Rescue, page 38, paragraph 7 (2004 Firebird edition)
  7. ^ Inda Glossary
  8. ^ "News". From the Desk of Sherwood Smith. Archived from the original on July 5, 2008. Retrieved September 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]