Shiba clan

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The emblem (mon) of the Shiba clan
In this Japanese name, the family name is "Shiba".

Shiba clan (斯波氏 Shiba-shi?) was a Japanese clan.[1]

History[edit]

The clan claimed descent from the Minamoto Yasuuji and the Seiwa-Genji.[1]

Shiba Ieuji was the son of Shiba Yasuuji who established the clan name at the end of the 13th century.[1]

The Shiba were based in Mutsu Province, which occupied the north of Honshū. The clan also inherited the governorship of Owari Province in present-day Aichi Prefecture.[2]

Shiba Takatsune (1305–1367) expanded the role of the clan when he sided with Ashikaga Takauji (1305–1358) in the skirmishes against the Emperor Go-Daigo in 1335. With the establishment of the Ashikaga shogunate Takauji awarded the office of shugo governor of Echizen and Wakasa provinces to Takatsune.[2]

Shiba Yoshimasa (1350–1410), son of Takatsune, held the office of kanrei from 1379 to 1397 during the Ashikaga shogunate.[3] The office of kanrei was continued by his son Shiba Yoshishige (1371 – 1418) and grandson Shiba Yoshiatsu (1397 – 1434).[2]

The clan held influence and territory in the provinces of Echizen Province and Owari Province to which they were governors during the Sengoku period.[citation needed]

The Shiba fell into factional dispute by the mid-1400s and were unable to make a transition to Sengoku-daimyo and lost Echizen to the Asakura in the 1470s. The feud within the Shiba clan and with other clans was one cause of the Ōnin War (1467–1477). The succession process was enacted by Asakura Toshikage, who took their power via usurpation. By the year 1550 the Shiba were represented by Shiba Yoshimune of Owari Province, a figurehead behind which the Iwakura branch of the Oda clan had ruled. His domain was Kiyosu Castle.[citation needed]

Shiba Yoshikane (d. 1572) was the son of Shiba Yoshimune.[1] When Yoshimune was killed in the year 1554 by Oda Nobutomo the clan effectively came to an end.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). ("Shiba," Nobiliare du Japon, p. 54 [PDF 58 of 80]; retrieved 2013-05-03.
  2. ^ a b c d "Shiba family". Encyclopedia of Japan. Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  3. ^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Shiba Yoshimasa" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 850.

External links[edit]

Media related to Shiba clan at Wikimedia Commons