Shimon Sheves

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Shimon Sheves
Born Israel
Nationality Israeli
Alma mater University of New Haven, Business and Public Administration
Occupation Founder and President of RSLB

Shimon Sheves was the General Director of the Israeli Prime Minister's office under the late Yizhak Rabin, between 1992 and 1995. Sheves now serves as a political advisor to governments and to political leaders around the world. He also serves as Chairman of RSLB, a company owned jointly by Sheves, former Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Chief of Staff Amnon Lipkin Shahak, Rabin's son Yuval Rabin and Israeli businessman Gil Berger.[1]

Politics[edit]

Sheves began his political career in local politics on the Golan Heights. He was the founder, Secretary and Farm Director of an Afik,[2] Chairman of the Golan Heights Economic Development Company, Chairman of the Golan Heights Settlements Committee and the Deputy to the Head of the Golan Regional Council.

In 1984, Sheves began his long relationship with Rabin when the latter, then the Minister of Defense of Israel, appointed him as his personal and political assistant. Sheves filled that role for six years, and during that time he was in charge of the Jewish settlements on the West Bank and of developing national infrastructure.

In the second half of the 1980s, Sheves was asked to sit on the board of several governmental companies and national bodies, including Israel Land Administration, Israel Aerospace Industries and Israeli Military Industries. He also chaired the committee to advance and integrate the Arab, Bedouin and Druze minorities in the Israeli society.

Leading up to the 1992 elections, Sheves was appointed to manage the campaign for the Labor Party, headed by Rabin. Labor won the most seats in the Knesset in these elections, and Rabin was appointed to form the Israeli government. Once Prime Minister he made Sheves Director General of the Prime Minister's Office.

On November 4, 1995, Prime Minister Rabin was assassinated at the end of a rally in support of the Oslo Accords, dubbed "Yes to Peace, No to Violence". The assassin was Yigal amir, a radical Jew who opposed the peace process.[citation needed]

Rabin's funeral was held on November 6, 1995. In attendance were representatives from 78 countries, including 23 kings and presidents and 22 prime ministers. Shimon Sheves was one of the eulogizers.[3] Others were the then-United States President Bill Clinton, the then-Israeli President Ezer Weizman, the then-acting Prime Minister Shimon Peres, King Hussein of Jordan and others. After Rabin's murder Sheves decided to quit Israeli politics.

Business career[edit]

Shimon Sheves is the Chairman of RSLB, an American company whose offices are located in Washington, D.C. RSLB assists and advises Israeli businesspeople and business owners who are interested in getting into the American market, and works in cooperation with international and transnational bodies, such as The World Bank, EXIM and IADB.

Sheves is also active in private international businesses in Europe and the United States. Since 2002, Sheves has been serving as a political and economic advisor to governments as well as to leaders in Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Austria, Serbia and the United States. He also advises on economic issues to large multinational corporations.

Public activity[edit]

Shimon Sheves has spoken several times about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the social protests in Israel, when addressing Israeli students and Jewish communities in Europe.

His public activity also includes helping Israeli voluntary associations involved in promoting democratic debate in Israel and helping the less fortunate.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1], Yuval Rabin, Shimon Sheves, Amnon Lipkin-Shahak, and Gil Birger became the first non-Americans to lobby the US administration on behalf of foreign countries.
  2. ^ Hoberman, Haggai (2008). Keneged Kol HaSikuim [Against All Odds] (in Hebrew) (1st ed.). Sifriat Netzaim. p. 252. 
  3. ^ [2], Shimon Sheves Eulogy on prime minister Yitzhak Rabin.

External links[edit]