Shinichi Mochizuki

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Shinichi Mochizuki
Born (1969-03-29) March 29, 1969 (age 45)[1]
Tokyo, Japan[1]
Nationality Japanese
Fields Mathematics
Institutions Kyoto University
Alma mater Princeton University
Doctoral advisor Gerd Faltings
Known for Proposed proof of abc conjecture
Notable awards JSPS Prize, Japan Academy Medal[1]

Shinichi Mochizuki (望月 新一 Mochizuki Shin'ichi?, born March 29, 1969) is a Japanese mathematician specializing in number theory.[2] He works in arithmetic geometry, Hodge theory, and anabelian geometry, and he introduced p-adic Teichmüller theory, Hodge–Arakelov theory, Frobenioids, and inter-universal Teichmüller theory. He was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in 1998.[3]

In August 2012, Mochizuki released what is claimed to be a proof of the abc conjecture; however, the claimed proof is very long and complex and is still being verified for correctness by other mathematicians.[2][4][5] The progress as of December 2013 is documented in a report.

Life[edit]

When he was five years old, Shinichi Mochizuki and his family left Japan to live in New York City. Mochizuki attended Phillips Exeter Academy and graduated in 1985.[6] He entered Princeton University as an undergraduate at age 16 and graduated salutatorian in 1988.[6] He then received a Ph.D. under the supervision of Gerd Faltings at age 23.[1] He joined the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Kyoto University in 1992 and was promoted to professor in 2002.[1]

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Mochizuki, Shinichi. "Curriculum Vitae". Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  2. ^ a b . "Proof claimed for deep connection between primes". Nature News. 10 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "International Congress of Mathemeticians 1998". 
  4. ^ Inter-universal Teichmüller theory IV: log-volume computations and set-theoretic foundations, Shinichi Mochizuki, August 2012
  5. ^ Chen, Caroline (9 May 2013). "The Paradox of the Proof". Project Wordsworth. 
  6. ^ a b "Seniors address commencement crowd". Princeton Weekly Bulletin. 20 June 1988. p. 4. 

External links[edit]