Shoal Lake 40 First Nation

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Shoal Lake 40 First Nation is an Ojibwa or Ontario Saulteaux First Nation located in the Eastman Region of Manitoba and the Kenora District of Ontario. The total registered population in August 2011 was 568, of which the on-reserve population was 266.[1] The first Nation is a member of the Bimose Tribal Council, a Regional Chief's Council that is a member of the Grand Council of Treaty 3.

The First Nation's Indian Bay, Manitoba 49°37′31″N 95°11′48″W / 49.62528°N 95.19667°W / 49.62528; -95.19667 community, known as Iskatewi-zaaga'iganiing in the Ojibwe language, is accessible via barge traffic from Iskatewizaagegan 39 First Nation's dock, located in the community of Kejick, Ontario, and in winter by ice roads. Shoal Lake 40 is joining forces with the neighboring Manitoba municipality of Reynolds to encourage the building of an all-weather road by two levels of government, in order to connect with the Trans-Canada Highway.[2] This would help to improve the economic conditions of the Shoal Lake 40 reserve. In earlier years, the community obtained many necessary supplies and goods via the Greater Winnipeg Water District (GWWD) railway as they were shipped to the GWWD water intake site. This terminus site for the railway was also known as Waugh Station. The First Nation possess basic infrastructure, limited retail outlets, indoor and outdoor recreational facilities and provide local elementary schooling to Grade 8.

In 1980, both First Nation bands in this area (#39 and #40) planned to develop 350 cottage lots on Indian Bay, Shoal Lake. This project was opposed by the City of Winnipeg due to concerns about the safety of its drinking water, which is drawn from Indian Bay.[3] The dispute was settled in 1989 when the Greater Winnipeg Water District placed $6 million in trust for Shoal Lake 40 with the interest to be used to fund alternative development projects. The agreement was conditional on a contribution of $3 million from the federal government.[4] A tripartite agreement was finalized when a parallel agreement was signed between the federal government and Shoal Lake 40 in 1990.[2][5]

Reserves[edit]

This First Nation occupies three reserves:

  • 2579 ha Shoal Lake 40, which serves as their main Reserve, containing the community of Indian Bay, Manitoba[6]
  • 172.4 ha Shoal Lake 34B2 Indian Reserve[7]
  • 379 ha Agency 30 Indian Reserve, which is shared with 12 other First Nations[8]

Governance[edit]

Shoal Lake 40 First Nation elects their leadership through the Act Electoral System. Currently, the First Nation is governed by Chief Erwin Redsky and 4 Councillors: Tom Anderson, Marcella Meekis, Vernon Redsky and Billy Wahpay. Their current two-year term of offices began on March 4, 2010.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shoal Lake No.40 - Registered Population as of August, 2011. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. Retrieved 8 September 2011.
  2. ^ a b At the mouth of the aqueduct, there's no water to drink. Winnipeg Free Press, 8 January 2011. Retrieved 7 September 2011.
  3. ^ Shoal Lake Aqueduct, Winnipeg, Manitoba. The National History Committee of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering, 1994. Retrieved 7 September 2011.
  4. ^ Agreements and Licenses - Urban Water Quality: Shoal Lake. Winnipeg Green Map - Source and Supply. Retrieved 14 September 2011.
  5. ^ [1] "List of Selected Treaties, Intergovernmental Agreements, Memoranda of Understanding, Orders, Draft Documents, etc. of Specific Relevance to the Shoal Lake Watershed." Government of Manitoba, Dept. of Water Stewardship. Retrieved 14 September 2011.
  6. ^ Aboriginal Canada Portal - Shoal Lake No.40. Retrieved 7 September 2011.
  7. ^ Aboriginal Canada Portal - Shoal Lake 34B2. Retrieved 7 September 2011.
  8. ^ Aboriginal Canada Portal - Agency 30. Retrieved 7 September 2011.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 49°36′45″N 95°08′41″W / 49.61250°N 95.14472°W / 49.61250; -95.14472