Shopping malls in New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Shopping malls in New Jersey have played a major role in shaping the suburban landscape of the state following World War II.

History[edit]

Westfield Garden State Plaza was the first mall to open in New Jersey and is the largest in the state

New Jersey, the most densely populated state in the United States, and in the suburban sphere of influence of both New York City and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, has a comparatively large number of notable malls throughout the state. Paramus, in Bergen County, is one of the largest shopping meccas in the country, with its four major shopping malls accounting for a significant proportion of the over $5 billion in annual retail sales generated in the borough, more than any other ZIP Code in the United States.[1] This high level of retail sales persists despite the fact that the County, in general, and the Borough, in particular, have blue laws that force the malls and other retailers to close on Sunday.

Westfield Garden State Plaza was the state's first shopping mall. It opened, in three stages, between May 1957 and August 1960 and was fully enclosed in 1983. The shopping complex is now known as Westfield Garden State Plaza. The Garden State's second mall-type shopping venue, Bergen Mall (now known as Outlets at Bergen Town Center), was built in Paramus and Maywood and was officially dedicated on November 14, 1957, with great fanfare, as Dave Garroway, host of The Today Show served as master of ceremonies.[2]

The mall, which was fully enclosed in 1973, was first planned in 1955 by Allied Stores to have 100 stores and 8,600 parking spaces in a 1.5 million ft² mall that would include a 300,000 ft (91,000 m)² Stern's store and two other 150,000 ft (46,000 m)² department stores as part of the initial design. Allied's chairman B. Earl Puckett confidently announced The Outlets at Bergen Town Center as the largest of ten proposed centers, stating that there were 25 cities that could support such centers and that no more than 50 malls of this type would ever be built nationwide.[3][4]

Cherry Hill Mall, was the first large indoor shopping center on the East Coast of the United States and attracted busloads of visitors soon after its opening in October 1961. (The Southdale Shopping Center in Edina, Minnesota, was the very first enclosed mall, beating Cherry Hill to the honor by five years). The popularity of the mall as a destination is often cited as one of the factors that led the mall's host municipality to change its name from Delaware Township, to its current name of Cherry Hill Township.[5]

Role as public square[edit]

Freehold Raceway Mall

With the shift in shopping from publicly owned Main Streets to privately held shopping malls, the question of access to malls, and their shoppers, as a public forum has been an issue raised nationwide. This issue has become particularly relevant in New Jersey, where malls in both suburban and exurban areas have largely supplanted local downtown districts as shopping destinations, depriving individuals and organizations of a public location to reach out to neighbors for distribution of fliers and other forms of expression. While different conclusions have been reached elsewhere, New Jersey's approach has been one of the most expansive in providing groups with access to malls as a public forum, despite their private ownership.

The Bergen Mall was the target of a lawsuit by nuclear-freeze advocates who challenged the malls restrictions on distribution of literature to shoppers. On October 12, 1984, Bergen County Superior Court judge Paul R. Huot ruled that the organization should be allowed to distribute literature anywhere and anytime in a shopping mall, noting that "The Bergen Mall has assumed the features and characteristics of the traditional town center for the citizens who reside in Paramus and surrounding Bergen County towns."[6]

The New Jersey Supreme Court has been at the forefront in providing access to malls as a public forum under the New Jersey State Constitution's free-speech protections, requiring private owners of shopping malls to allow use as a forum by individuals and groups. In New Jersey Coalition Against War in the Middle East v. JMB Realty Corp. (1994), the Court ruled that because the mall owners "have intentionally transformed their property into a public square or market, a public gathering place, a downtown business district, a community," they cannot later deny their own implied invitation to use the space as it was clearly intended.[7] Despite the broad powers granted to those seeking to use these facilities as public forums, mall owners retain the right to establish regulations regulating the time, place and manner of exercising of freedom of speech rights on their properties.[8]

Role as performance venue[edit]

In their role as a public forum, malls have also developed a role as a public performance venue, as an addition to theaters, arenas and stadiums. Singer Tiffany was one of the pioneers in this innovative use of malls, using the mall tour as a stepping stone to stardom. The first performance on Tiffany's mall tour — "The Beautiful You: Celebrating The Good Life Shopping Mall Tour '87" — took place on June 23, 1987 at The Bergen Mall (now known as Outlets at Bergen Town Center) in Paramus. The tour was sponsored by major advertisers Toyota, Clairol, and Adidas.[9] While perhaps not the first singer to do so, Tiffany established the shopping mall as a location for public performances. Britney Spears' Hair Zone Mall Tour built on Tiffany's use of the mall as a medium to reach fans. Currently, the New Jersey Youth Symphony plays annually in the Jersey Gardens Outlet Mall. This performance is known as the Playathon and occurs in March.

List of malls[edit]

The following is a list of shopping malls in the state of New Jersey (ordered by location, but click on the sort tag after each column to change the sort order):

Mall Location Gross leasable area (in sq ft) Notes
The Pier Shops at Caesars Atlantic City 320,000 [10]
The Quarter at Tropicana Atlantic City 200,000 [11]
The Marketplace At Brick
Brick Current stores open include Costco, Christmas Tree Shops, Harmon FaceValues, Dick's Sporting Goods, Staples, City Nails and Spa, Hair Cuttery, Turning Point Café, Petco, Tommy's Coal Fired Pizza, Qdoba Mexican Grill, American Automobile Association, Chase Bank, and Houlihan's.
Bridgewater Commons Bridgewater 900,000 [12]
Bridgewater Promenade Bridgewater 370,545 [13]

Anchors: Macy's, Bloomingdale's and Lord & Taylor

Bridgewater Town Centre Bridgewater 460,000 [14]
Kinnelon Mall Butler
Burlington Center Mall Burlington Township 670,000 [15]
Cherry Hill Mall Cherry Hill 1,283,000 [16] First enclosed shopping mall in New Jersey and on East Coast of United States
Streets of Chester Chester Borough
Cinnaminson Mall Cinnaminson Cinnaminson Mall (1972) was a mini-mall with a Woolco and a twin cinema. The new shopping complex redeveloped by Centro Properties Group, offers opportunities for various sized retailers in diverse categories for both in-line space and outparcels. The redevelopment of the Cinnaminson Mall and The Shoppes at Cinnaminson whereby all existing buildings have been demolished and a new ground up 330,000-square-foot (31,000 m2) Shop-Rite supermarket anchored community shopping center is being constructed on 40 acres (160,000 m2).
Deptford Mall Deptford 1,069,657 [17]
Brunswick Square Mall East Brunswick 769,041 [18]
Xanadu Meadowlands
(under construction)
East Rutherford 2,000,000 [19]
Monmouth Mall Eatontown 1,500,000 [20]
Menlo Park Mall Edison 1,232,000 [21]

Anchors: Macy's & Nordstrom

Harbor Square (formerly Shore Mall) Egg Harbor Township 635,000 [22]
Jersey Gardens Elizabeth 1,292,611 [23]
The Promenade at Sagemore Evesham 272,000 [24]
American Way Mall
(defunct)
Fairfield
Flemington Marketplace
(Flemington Mall)
Flemington Flemington shopping directory
Dead Malls
Liberty Village Premium Outlets Flemington Chelsea Property Group
Freehold Raceway Mall Freehold 1,671,000 [25]

Anchors: Macy's, JCPenney, Lord & Taylor, Nordstrom, & Sears

The Shops at Riverside Hackensack 637,963 [26] Closed on Sundays.
Cedar Knolls Plaza (formerly Morris County Mall) Hanover Township 258,524 [27]
Hudson Mall Jersey City Hudson Mall
Newport Centre Jersey City 1,149,147 [28]
Quaker Bridge Mall Lawrenceville 1,102,000 [29]
Ledgewood Mall Ledgewood (in Roxbury) 518,246 [30]
Livingston Mall Livingston 980,000 [31]
Manalapan Mall
(defunct)
Manalapan became Manalapan EpiCentre
Hamilton Mall Mays Landing 1,028,500 [32]
Moorestown Mall Moorestown 1,046,100 [33]
Seaview Square Mall
(defunct)
Ocean Township (Monmouth County)
Gateway Shopping Center Old Bridge
The Outlets at Bergen Town Center Paramus 917,129 [34] One of several malls within a short distance. Closed on Sundays.
Fashion Center Paramus 446,000 [35] One of several malls within a short distance. Closed on Sundays.
Garden State Plaza Paramus 2,132,112 [36] One of several malls within a short distance. Closed on Sundays.
Paramus Park Paramus 771,000 [37] One of several malls within a short distance. Closed on Sundays.
Hillcrest Professional Plaza (formerly Hillcrest Mall) Phillipsburg SMB Construction, Inc.
Phillipsburg Mall Phillipsburg 536,000 [38]
Forrestal Village Plainsboro 720,000
Princeton MarketFair Princeton
Rio Mall
(defunct)
Rio Grande now Walmart Supercenter
Rockaway Townsquare
Rockaway Township 1,250,000 [39]

Anchors: JCPenney, Lord & Taylor, Macy's, & Sears

Mill Creek Mall Secaucus 400,000 sq ft[40]
Short Hills Mall Short Hills in (Millburn) 1,342,000 [41]

Anchors: Bloomingdale's, Macy's, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom & Saks Fifth Avenue

Middlesex Mall South Plainfield 320,000 [42]
Roxbury Mall Succasunna (in Roxbury) 706,000 [43]
Jersey Shore Premium Outlets
Tinton Falls Opened November 13, 2008
Ocean County Mall Toms River 890,000 [44]
Seacourt Pavilion Toms River 253,000 [45]
Cumberland Mall Vineland 921,593 [46]
Voorhees Town Center Voorhees 1,127,308 [47]
Wayne Hills Mall Wayne 250,000
Wayne Towne Center Wayne 653,000 [48]
Willowbrook Mall Wayne 1,514,000 [49]
Village Mall Willingboro 527,000 Village Mall was anchored by Acme Market, Woolco/Caldor, and a twin Eric Theater. Became Grand Marketplace
Willingboro Town Center
(former Willingboro Plaza)
Willingboro Plaza stores included Sears, Pomeroy's, Woolworth, Walgreens, Food Fair, Fox theater, Cutler Camera, Baker's Shoes, Radio Shack, Ricardo's Pizza, and Burlington County College Center II.
Woodbridge Center Woodbridge 1,633,000 [50]

Largest malls[edit]

The largest malls in New Jersey — those with at least 1 million square feet (90,000 m²) of Gross Leasable Area (GLA) and ranked in descending order by size — are:

  1. Westfield Garden State Plaza - 2,140,120 sq ft (198,824 m2)
  2. Freehold Raceway Mall - 1,671,000 sq ft (155,200 m2)
  3. Woodbridge Center - 1,633,000 sq ft (151,700 m2)
  4. Willowbrook Mall - 1,514,000 sq ft (140,700 m2)
  5. Monmouth Mall - 1,500,000 sq ft (140,000 m2)
  6. Short Hills Mall - 1,340,000 sq ft (124,000 m2)
  7. Jersey Gardens - 1,292,611 sq ft (120,087.5 m2)
  8. Rockaway Townsquare - 1,249,000 sq ft (116,000 m2)
  9. Cherry Hill Mall - 1,248,347 sq ft (115,975.2 m2)
  10. Menlo Park Mall - 1,232,000 sq ft (114,500 m2)
  11. Newport Centre - 1,149,147 sq ft (106,759.2 m2)
  12. Quaker Bridge Mall - 1,102,000 sq ft (102,400 m2)
  13. Moorestown Mall - 1,046,100 sq ft (97,190 m2)
  14. Deptford Mall - 1,069,657 sq ft (99,374.4 m2)
  15. Hamilton Mall - 1,028,500 sq ft (95,550 m2)
  16. Livingston Mall - 985,000 sq ft (91,500 m2)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paramus 07652, GlobeSt. Retail, October 3, 2005.
  2. ^ "Shoppers Throng to Opening of Bergen Mall in Jersey". New York Times. November 15, 1957. Retrieved 2007-06-07. "The 106-acre Bergen Mall regional shopping center here will open Thursday morning. The center, at which Stern's will be the principal-store, is being built by the Allied Stores Corporation at a cost of $40,000,000." 
  3. ^ "10 Shopping Centers Scheduled For Allied Stores Within 3 Years; Chain' s Chairman Gives Details of Biggest, 7 Miles From George Washington Span, Where Stern Will Open Branch by '57: STORE CHAIN PLANS 10 RETAIL CENTERS", The New York Times, January 13, 1955. p. 37
  4. ^ Bergen Mall's makeover approved, The Record (Bergen County), December 1, 2006.
  5. ^ Cherry Hill Township: About Us, accessed September 4, 2006.
  6. ^ "JERSEY JUDGE ORDERS LEAFLET DISTRIBUTION IN MALL AT ANY TIME", The New York Times, October 21, 1984. p. A.49
  7. ^ assembly on private property, First Amendment Center, accessed August 10, 2006.
  8. ^ The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press: ACCESS TO PRIVATE PROPERTY, accessed August 10, 2006.
  9. ^ Chronology of the Life and Career of Tiffany, accessed August 10, 2006.
  10. ^ The Pier At Caesars, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed February 17, 2007.
  11. ^ The Quarter, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 6, 2006.
  12. ^ Bridgewater Commons, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed October 3, 2006.
  13. ^ Bridgewater Promenade, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  14. ^ Bridgewater Town Centre, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  15. ^ Burlington Center Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  16. ^ Cherry Hill Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  17. ^ Deptford Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers, backed up by the Internet Archive as of March 6, 2012. Accessed November 9, 2013.
  18. ^ Brunswick Square Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  19. ^ Meadowlands Xanadu, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 6, 2006.
  20. ^ Monmouth Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 5, 2012. Accessed November 9, 2013.
  21. ^ Menlo Park Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  22. ^ Shore Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  23. ^ Jersey Gardens, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed November 6, 2006.
  24. ^ The Promenade at Sagemore, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  25. ^ Freehold Raceway Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 5, 2012. Accessed November 9, 2013.
  26. ^ The Shops at Riverside, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed November 6, 2006.
  27. ^ Cedar Knolls Plaza, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed April 23, 2008.
  28. ^ Newport Centre Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  29. ^ Quaker Bridge Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  30. ^ Ledgewood Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed October 16, 2006.
  31. ^ Livingston Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  32. ^ Hamilton Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  33. ^ Moorestown Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  34. ^ Bergen Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed November 6, 2006.
  35. ^ Fashion Center, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  36. ^ Westfield Group
  37. ^ Paramus Park, International Council of Shopping Centers, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 7, 2012. Accessed November 9, 2013.
  38. ^ Phillipsburg Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  39. ^ Rockaway Townsquare Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  40. ^ Mill Creek Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  41. ^ The Mall at Short Hills, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  42. ^ Middlesex Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  43. ^ Roxbury Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed October 16, 2006.
  44. ^ Ocean County Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  45. ^ Seacourt Pavilion, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  46. ^ Cumberland Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed December 25, 2006.
  47. ^ Echelon Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  48. ^ Wayne Towne Center, International Council of Shopping Centers. Accessed September 21, 2006.
  49. ^ Willowbrook Mall, International Council of Shopping Centers, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 7, 2012. Accessed November 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Woodbridge Center, International Council of Shopping Centers, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 7, 2012. Accessed November 9, 2013.