Short turn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A bus route map showing a short turn

In public transport, a short turn or turn-back is an earlier terminus on a bus or rail line that is used on some scheduled trips that do not operate along the full length of the route.[1]

Short turns are practical in scheduling when the short-turning bus can proceed through its layover at the short turn loop, then start a run in the opposite direction, all while reducing the number of buses needed to operate all trips along the route as opposed to if all scheduled trips operated to the terminus of full-length trips.[2]

Short turns require the availability of a separate loop on the bus or rail line where the vehicle can turn around and lay over. On bus routes, this could be streets that can accommodate bus traffic. On a rail line, this means a location where the layover does not interfere with other rail traffic.

On rail lines, short turns are more limited due to the number of crossovers between tracks.[3]

Purposes[edit]

Demand for services[edit]

Short turns are used on bus routes and rail lines where there is a lower demand for service along the part of the route not served by the short-turning trips. This helps in reducing operating costs.[4] While more economical, these short turns do not necessarily reduce the number of buses needed to operate the full amount of service along the route.[5]

Crowd management[edit]

Short turns can aid in reducing overcrowding of buses. By scheduling uneven intervals between full-length and short turn trips, this may lead to accommodation of more riders on the trips coming out of the short turn layover location.[6][7]

Short turns can be used to reduce bus bunching.[8]

Branches[edit]

Some bus and rail routes have multiple branches serving different locations, but are otherwise identified with the same designation. These separate branches are not officially short turns, but in such an operation, the common part of the route has more service than the individual branches, just like a short turn service.

Some multi-branch routes have approximately the same number of trips along each branch. Other routes have a main branch where the majority of service operates, along with selected trips to other locations. Such trips sometimes only operate during certain hours of the day, peak hours, on certain days of the week, or to meet the needs of a particular employer.

An example of a multi-branch service is the MBTA Green Line, which operates on four branches. The branches fan out on surface tracks west of the downtown region, but operate through the Tremont Street Subway tunnel in downtown. Approximately three-quarters of eastbound trains also short-turn in the downtown tunnel; two-thirds of these at Government Center and the other one-third at North Station. Additionally, some outbound Green Line "E" Branch trips short-turn at Brigham Circle to avoid traffic on the street-running outer section of the line.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tom Parkinson, Ian Fisher (1996). Rail transit capacity. Transportation Research Board. p. 118. ISBN 0-309-05718-3. 
  2. ^ Daniel K. Boyle (2009). Controlling system costs: basic and advanced scheduling manuals and contemporary issues in transit scheduling. Transportation Research Board. pp. 2–6. ISBN 0-309-11783-6. 
  3. ^ Mark Hickman, Pitu B. Mirchandani, Stefan Voss (2008). Computer-aided systems in public transport. p. 334. ISBN 3-540-73311-6. 
  4. ^ Avishai Ceder (2007). Public transit planning and operation: theory, modelling and practice. Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 10. ISBN 0-7506-6166-6. 
  5. ^ Avishai Ceder (2007). Public transit planning and operation: theory, modelling and practice. Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 457. ISBN 0-7506-6166-6. 
  6. ^ Daniel K. Boyle (2009). Controlling system costs: basic and advanced scheduling manuals and contemporary issues in transit scheduling. Transportation Research Board. pp. 3–75. ISBN 0-309-11783-6. 
  7. ^ Daniel K. Boyle (2009). Controlling system costs: basic and advanced scheduling manuals and contemporary issues in transit scheduling. Transportation Research Board. p. 7-6. ISBN 0-309-11783-6. 
  8. ^ Avishai Ceder (2007). Public transit planning and operation: theory, modelling and practice. Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 478. ISBN 0-7506-6166-6.