Shulem Moshkovitz

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Shulem Moshkovitz
Shotzer Rebbe
Term ??? – 1958
Full name Shulem Moshkowitz
Main work Daas Sholom
Born Suceava
Buried Adath Yisroel Cemetery, Enfield
Successor Dovid Moshkowitz
Father Mordechai Yosef Moshe Moshkowitz
Wife Shlomtza Moshkowitz

Rabbi Shulem Moshkovitz, known as the Shotzer Rebbe, was born in Suceava, Romania. He was a descendant of the famed chasidic Rebbe Yechiel Mikhl of Zlotshov.

He emigrated to London, England, before World War II, settling in Stamford Hill, a part of London where not many hasidic Jews lived then. In London he became known as the Shotzer Rebbe. He established a Beis Medrash affiliated to the Union of Orthodox Hebrew Congregations.

Rabbi Shulem was the son of Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Moshe of Sulitza. He married Shlomtza, his first cousin, the daughter of his father's brother, Rabbi Meir, and his first wife, Dinah. The Shotzer Rebbe wrote several volumes of Torah commentaries named Daas Sholom, are arranged according to the order of Perek Shira. He was a genius both in the revealed Torah and in Kabbala, and lived a lifestyle of holiness and simplicity.

Among the Shotzer Rebbe's descendants are Rabbi David Moskowitz, the Shotzer Rebbe of Ashdod, Israel, and Rabbi Naftali Asher Yeshayahu Moskowitz, the Shotz-Melitzer Rebbe, also in Ashdod, author of several books, including Peiros Hailan on the laws of Chol HaMoed, and Nefesh Chaya, a commentary and interpretation of the Book of Psalms.

He died in London on 22 Teves 5718 (1958), and is buried in the Adath Yisroel cemetery in Enfield. An ohel was built over his grave. His gravesite is known as a source of yeshuos and people from all over the world travel to his kever to seek salvations;[1] it is a place of pilgrimage every Friday

Rabbi Shulem left an ethical will specifying that anyone could come to his grave and ask for his help, as long as they undertake to better themselves in at least one way in exchange.[2]

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