Shraga Weil

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Shrage Weil
שרגא ווייל
Shraga weil.jpg
Born Shraga Weil
(1918-09-24)September 24, 1918
Nitra, Czechoslovakia
Died February 20, 2009(2009-02-20) (aged 90)
Israel
Nationality Israeli
Education Prague School of Art, Academie des Beaux Arts, Paris
Known for Painting, Graphics, Printmaking
Movement Modern
Awards Dizengoff Prize (1959)

Shraga Weil (Hebrew: שרגא ווייל‎; September 24, 1918 – February 20, 2009) was an Israeli painter.

Biography[edit]

Weil was born in Nitra, Czechoslovakia in 1918 to a family of teachers, journalists and merchants. His father was a building engineer. He was sent to study with a local sculptor, and then to the Academy of Art in Prague. He produced his first graphic works during World War II, during which he spent as a prisoner. After the War, he sailed for Israel on an illegal immigrant ship. He arrived in Israel in 1947 and became a member of Kibbutz HaOgen, where he lived until his death.

In 1954, he studied murals and graphic techniques at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris. He also studied mosaics in Ravenna with Professor Severini.

Weil died on February 20, 2009.

Work[edit]

Weil's works have been exhibited in the United States, South America, Canada, Australia, France, the USSR, Switzerland, and in the International Exhibition of Graphic Arts, in Lugano.

Weil's artwork is in the permanent collections of Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Fogg Museum, Harvard University, Los Angeles County Museum, Jewish Museum, New York, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Joslyn Museum, Omaha, Nebraska, Judah Magnes Museum, Berkeley, CA, as well as others.

Awards[edit]

In 1959, Weil was awarded the Dizengoff Prize for Painting.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Dizengoff Prize laureates" (in Hebrew). Tel Aviv Municipality. 

Further reading[edit]

  • "Twelve Israeli Painters, Published by Lion the Printer, Tel Aviv, 1965
  • "Shraga Weil - 60 years of Printmaking", Gideon Ofrat, Safrai Fine Art Gallery Jerusalem, 2000, 148 pages

External links[edit]