Shrikhand

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Shrikhand bekar la
Shrikhand london kastoori.jpg
Shrikhand with crushed almonds, saffron and cardamom
Place of origin
India
Main ingredients
Yogurt, sugar, cardamom or saffron
Cookbook:Shrikhand bekar la  Shrikhand bekar la

Shrikhand is an Indian sweet dish made of strained yogurt.[1] It is one of the main desserts in Maharashtrian cuisine and Gujarati cuisine. Preparation of this dish is very simple but it takes some time to process yogurt properly.

To prepare shrikhand, yogurt is tied in a cotton cloth and left under pressure to drain. In the past, it used to be hung from a wall to achieve the desired thickness. The strained yogurt, referred to as "Chakka", and sugar are mixed thoroughly in a deep bowl. Cardamom, saffron, and any other flavors are then added and mixed. It is then left in the refrigerator for the sugar to dissolve. The dish is served chilled.

A popular variation of shrikhand in Maharashtra is Amrakhand (आम्रखंड), which is shrikhand blended with mango pulp. Another variant of shrikhand, Matho (મઠો), is served as a sweet dish or dessert particularly in Gujarati cuisine.

In Gujarati cuisine, shrikhand is eaten as either a side-dish with breads such as poori (usually "khaaja poori", which is a savory fried flaky bread) or as a dessert. It is commonly served as part of a vegetarian thali in Gujarati restaurants and is popular as part of wedding feasts. It is often served chilled as a counterpoint to hot and spicy curries. Dried and fresh fruit such as mango are also added.[citation needed]

One another less popular dish, in fact a variant of the shrikhand is 'Shedki' (Gujarati: શેડકી), particularly famous in the town of Khambhat (Cambay) in Gujarat. The dish is a liquified version of Shrikhand served chilled with rose petals in it, which is served in earthen pots.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Shrikhand". Amchirecipes.com. Retrieved 2012-09-21. 

External Links[edit]

Amrakhand (Mango Shrikhand) Recipe