Shure Beta 58A

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The Shure Beta 58A microphone

The Shure Beta 58A is a rugged dynamic supercardioid microphone developed by Shure Incorporated specifically for live vocal performances.[1] The microphone won a TEC Award in 1996 for outstanding microphone technology.[2]

Shure's Beta series of microphones was introduced in 1989. The first Beta 58 had a hypercardioid pickup pattern.[1] In 1996, Shure altered the Beta 58 to create the Beta 58A, the changes including a reinforced grille, reduced handling noise, and a more forgiving supercardioid pickup pattern with a smaller rear lobe, less prone to feedback in the presence of loud stage monitors on the floor in front of the singer.[3] As with any supercardioid pattern microphone, stage monitors should be placed between 30 and 60 degrees to one side of the microphone rather than directly on axis to its rear.[1]

Though the shape and intended applications are similar, the Beta 58A has little in common with the earlier and popular Shure SM58.[1] The Beta series uses a different capsule and transformer than the SM series. The Beta 58A has a frequency response extending from 50 to 16,000 Hz, with frequencies attenuated below 500 Hz to counter the proximity effect.[4][1] The Beta 58A has two high frequency presence peaks, one at 4 kHz and another at 10 kHz.[1]

Users[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f White, Paul (July 1996). "Shure Beta Series: Dynamic & Back-electret Microphones". Sound On Sound. 
  2. ^ "1996 TEC Awards: Nominees and Winners". TEC Foundation. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  3. ^ Studio Sound (Miller Freeman) 38 (1–6): 142. 1996. 
  4. ^ Shure Beta 58A Vocal Microphone
  5. ^ "The Cat Empire use the following Shure Products". Shure endorsee. JANDS. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  6. ^ Barker, Greg (March 30, 2009). "Hell, Damnation and Vocal Technique – Chuck Billy of Testament". Voice Council magazine. 
  7. ^ Maffei, Tim (June 1, 2004). "Breathing Air into the Mix". Pro Sound News. 
  8. ^ "Empire Of The Sun use the following Shure Products". Shure endorsee. JANDS. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  9. ^ "The Herd use the following Shure Products". Shure endorsee. JANDS. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  10. ^ Moles, Steve (July–August 2006). "On Tour: Sir Elton". Light & Sound: 59. 
  11. ^ "Shure Microphones The Choice Of Latest Slash Tour". ProSoundWeb. November 17, 2010. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Kid Kenobi uses the following Shure Products". Shure endorsee. JANDS. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Alison Krauss & Union Station in Nashville". Mic Check. Shure Artist Relations. September 19, 2011. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Matt & Kim: Mad Chaos @ Metro Chicago". Mic Check. Shure Artist Relations. September 20, 2010. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Filter & Saliva Co-headlining Tour". Mic Check. Shure Artist Relations. June 2, 2011. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Powderfinger uses the following Shure Products". Shure endorsee. JANDS. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  17. ^ "The Presets use the following Shure Products". Shure endorsee. JANDS. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Sneaky Sound System use the following Shure Products". Shure endorsee. JANDS. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  19. ^ "Tedeschi Trucks Band in Chicago". Mic Check. Shure Artist Relations. August 30, 2011. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  20. ^ Gelfand, Michael. "Who is Tricky?". Shadows&Light. Retrieved October 3, 2011.  Originally published August 1998 in Musician magazine.
  21. ^ "Shure Microphones, Personal Monitor Systems For The Who At Super Bowl XLIV Hafltime Show". ProSoundWeb. February 9, 2010. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  22. ^ "Mitches Wedding Day Part 1 (May 8th, 2010)". May 8, 2010.