Sidelight

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Door with sidelights

A sidelight is a window, usually with a vertical emphasis, that flanks a door. Sidelights are narrow, usually stationary and found immediately adjacent doorways.[1][2] While most commonly found as supporting elements emphasizing the importance of a primary entrance, sidelights may be employed at any interior or exterior door where a visual emphasis is desired, or where additional light or visibility is needed.

Design[edit]

Sidelights are often found in tandem with transom windows and generally the pane size in the sidelights match that of the transom.[3] Typically narrow, sidelights can be placed on both or just one side of a door and can include a sash or have glass that is stopped into the frame.[4]

Security and privacy concerns[edit]

While transom windows generally do not have any privacy concerns associated with them because of their height, sidelights usually need to be covered to ensure privacy.[5] Any number of window treatments can be employed to enhance privacy in doorways with sidelights. Miniblinds, micro-miniblinds, and shirred curtains are among the window treatments that offer an increased level of privacy.[5] Another choice is stained or beveled glass, which can offer some privacy while also contributing to the overall beauty of a building's design.[5]

When approaching building security sidelights can factor into entrance security. For instance, for proper security a sidelight should only be installed on the side of the door without the door knob or handle.[6] Sidelights provide people on a building's interior with a narrow view of the outdoors and as such doors without sidelights, especially in apartment buildings, should be equipped with a peephole.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barr, Peter. "Illustrated Glossary", 19th Century Adrian Architecture, accessed June 17, 2009.
  2. ^ "The College Hill Historic District", Community Partnership Center, accessed June 17, 2009.
  3. ^ Wilson, Steve. Exterior House Trim: Creative Ideas for the Exterior of Your Home, (Google Books), Creative Homeowner, 2006, p. 63, (ISBN 1580113192).
  4. ^ Mouzon, Stephen A. and Henderson, Susan M. Traditional Construction Patterns, (Google Books), McGraw-Hill Professional, 2004, p. 47, (ISBN 0071416323).
  5. ^ a b c Nielson, Karla J. Window Treatments, (Google Books), John Wiley and Sons, 1989, pp. 92-93, (ISBN 0471289469).
  6. ^ a b Atlas, Randall I. 21st Century Security and CPTED: Designing for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Crime Prevention, (Google Books), CRC Press, 2008, pp. 248-49, (ISBN 1420068075).