Sidney Meyrick

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Sir Sidney Meyrick
Born 28 March 1879
Died 18 December 1973
Chichester, Sussex
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Years of service 1893 - 1940
Rank Vice Admiral
Commands held HMS Courageous
6th Destroyer Flotilla
HMS Revenge
HMS Nelson
2nd Cruiser Squadron
America and West Indies Station
Battles/wars First World War
Second World War
Awards Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath

Admiral Sir Sidney Julius Meyrick KCB (28 March 1879 – 18 December 1973) was a Royal Navy officer who went on to be Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station.

Naval career[edit]

Meyrick joined the Royal Navy in 1893. He served in the First World War in HMS Erin and then in HMS Resolution in the Grand Fleet.[1]

After the War he became Flag Captain commanding HMS Courageous and Chief Staff Officer to the Commander-in-Chief of the Reserve Fleet in 1920 and then moved on to be Commander of the 6th Destroyer Flotilla in 1921.[1] He was made Flag Captain commanding HMS Revenge and Chief Staff Officer to the Commander-in-Chief of the Atlantic Fleet in 1922.[1]

He joined the Staff of Royal Naval College at Greenwich in 1923 and became Director of Training and Staff Duties at the Admiralty in 1926.[1] He was appointed Flag Captain commanding HMS Nelson and Captain of the Fleet to the Commander-in-Chief of the Atlantic Fleet in 1927 before becoming Captain of the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth in 1929 and Naval Secretary in 1932.[1] He was then made Commander of the 2nd Cruiser Squadron in 1934 and Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station in 1937.[1]

At the start of the Second World War, formations under Meyrick's command as Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station, included the 8th Cruiser Squadron and two escort ships.[2] In 1940 he was credited with forcing the Captain of the German liner Columbus to scuttle his ship.[3] He retired in 1940.[1]

He died at Norton House, near Chichester in Sussex.[4]

Family[edit]

In 1901 he married Judith Fullerton, the daughter of Admiral Sir John Fullerton;[5] they had three sons.[4]

References[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
George Chetwode
Naval Secretary
1932–1934
Succeeded by
Guy Royle
Preceded by
Sir Matthew Best
Commander-in-Chief, America and West Indies Station
1937–1940
Succeeded by
Sir Charles Kennedy-Purvis