Siemowit

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Siemowit
Siemowit.PNG
Siemowit plate by Walery Eljsasz-Radzikowski (1841-1905).
Duke of the Polans
Predecessor Bolesław the Forgotten
Successor Lestek
Issue Lestek
House House of Piast
Father Piast the Wheelwright
Mother Rzepicha
Religion Pagan

Siemowit (also Ziemowit) was, according to the chronicles of Gallus Anonymus, the son of Piast the Wheelwright and Rzepicha. He was considered one of the four legendary Piast princes, but is now considered as a ruler who existed as a historical person.[1]

He became the Duke of the Polans in the 9th century after his father, Piast the Wheelwright, son of Chościsko, refused to take the place of legendary Duke Popiel. Siemowit was elected as new duke by the wiec.[2] According to a popular legend, Popiel was then eaten by mice in his tower on the Gopło lake.[3]

The only mention of Siemowit, along with his son, Lestek, and grandson, Siemomysł, comes in the medieval chronicle of Gallus Anonymus.[4]

Siemowit's great grandson, Mieszko I of the Piast dynasty, is considered the first ruler of Poland to be baptized, though evidence of Arian Christians predating his reign was discovered in south Poland.[citation needed][clarification needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ K. Jasiński, Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, p. 47.
  2. ^ Janusz Roszko (1980). Kolebka Siemowita. "Iskry". p. 170. ISBN 978-83-207-0090-9. Retrieved 29 February 2012. 
  3. ^ Jan Bondeson. Two-Headed Boy, and Other Medical Marvels. Cornell University Press. pp. 91–2. ISBN 978-0-8014-8958-7. 
  4. ^ (English) (Latin) Gallus Anonymus; Knoll, Schoer, Bisson, Schaen. The Chronicles and Deeds of the Dukes or Princes of the Poles. Central European University Press. pp. 17–22. ISBN 978-963-9241-40-4. 

See also[edit]