Sierra Championship Boxing

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Sierra Championship Boxing
Developer(s) Evryware
Publisher(s) Sierra On-Line
Platform(s) Apple II, Commodore 64, PC (DOS), Macintosh
Release date(s) 1983
Genre(s) Traditional boxing simulation
Mode(s) Single player
Distribution Floppy disk

Sierra Championship Boxing is a boxing video game developed by Evryware and published by Sierra On-Line in 1983.[1] Versions were released for Apple II, Commodore 64, DOS, and Macintosh.

Summary[edit]

The game combines elements of action, strategy and sports simulation genres. The player can control the boxer during the rounds or act as cornerman, issuing instructions between rounds. The game also allows for simulated matches with no player input. The player can choose from a roster of real fighters from different eras, or create a boxer with customized abilities.

Sierra Championship Boxing was the first PC game Evryware developed. The game was initially going to be published by Microsoft, but Microsft decided at the last minute that the home market wasn't big enough yet. Evryware's contact at Microsoft told Ken Williams at Sierra On-Line about the game; Sierra offered Evryware a contract and published the game in 1983.[1]

Reception[edit]

InfoWorld called Sierra Championship Boxing "by far the most extensive sports game created for a microcomputer" and suggested that the game "could usher in a new era of sports simulation games" that use "the power and memory of the IBM PC and PC Jr" to store detailed information about real people.[2] Computer Gaming World reviewed the Commodore version negatively. The reviewer praised the game's options and graphics, but criticized its lack of realism.[3] PC Magazine gave the game 14.5 points out of 18, calling it "one of those breakthrough games that comes along ever so infrequently these days ... Championship Boxing is a knockout".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kolcu, Orchun (1 June 1997). "Interview with Evryware (Part 1)". Games Domain. Archived from the original on 1 February 2001. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  2. ^ Mace, Scott (June 25, 1984). "Bruising Bodies in Collision". InfoWorld 6 (26): 38. Retrieved 1 October 2011. 
  3. ^ Teverbaugh, Rick (April 1986). "Sports Scoreboard". Computer Gaming World (27). 
  4. ^ Sandler, Corey (1984-11-13). "Ringside Thrills". PC Magazine. p. 311. Retrieved 25 October 2013.