Sierra Crest

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Sierra Crest
Ridgeline
Sierra Nevada aerial.jpg
The Mills Creek cirque (center) is part of the Sierra Crest, which extends across mounts Abbot and Mills on the southeast rim (right). Northward from the cirque along the right of the image's centerline is the crest's Red and White Mountain, the triple watershed point for the Middle and South Forks San Joaquin River with the Owens River. The crest extends northwest to Mammoth Crest and Mammoth Mountain and then west of Mono Lake (top, blue) in the north, e.g., across Tioga Pass west of the Wheeler Crest.
Country United States
State California
Endpoints North: Fredonyer Pass, South: Tehachapi Pass
Highest summit
Highest pass
Highest road pass
Mount Whitney
Trail Crest
Tioga Pass (CA 120)

The Sierra Crest is a ~500 mi (800 km) generally north-to-south ridgeline that demarcates the broad west and narrow east slopes of the Sierra Nevada (U.S.) and that extends as far east as the Sierra's topographic front (e.g., Diamond Mountains and Sierran escarpment[1]). The northern and central Sierra Crest sections coincide with over 300 mi (480 km) of the Great Basin Divide,[2] and the southern crest demarcates Tulare & Inyo counties and extends through Kern County to meet the Tehachapi crest. The Sierra Crest also forms two paths (bifurcates) around endorheic cirques (e.g., Cup Lake) between the west and east Sierra slopes. From 1892-7, Theodore Solomons made the first attempt to map a crest route along the Sierras.[3]

Sierra Crest is located in California
Pegleg.Mountain
Pegleg.Mountain
closest.to.Nevada
closest.to.Nevada
local.westernmost.point
local.westernmost.point
Sacramento/San.Joaquin.triple.point
Sacramento/San.Joaquin.triple.point
San.Joaquin/Kings.triple.point
San.Joaquin/Kings.triple.point
Mt.Whitney (highest)
Mt.Whitney (highest)
117.979°W
117.979°W
Sierra Crest extreme points

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilkerson, Gregg, et al (2007). "Roadside Geology and Mining History: Owens Valley and Mono Basin" (PDF). BLM.gov. p. 51. Retrieved 2010-06-22. 
  2. ^ "Boundary Descriptions and Names of Regions, Subregions, Accounting Units and Cataloging Units". USGS.gov. Retrieved 2010-06-07. 
  3. ^ Roper, Steve (1997). Sierra High Route: Traversing Timberline Country. The Mountaineers Press. ISBN 0-89886-506-9.