Silesian dumplings

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Silesian dumplings
Kluski śląskie 01.jpg
Silesian dumplings (white variety)
Type Dumpling
Region or state Silesia
Main ingredients Mashed potatoes, potato flour, wheat flour
Variations White dumplings, black dumplings
Cookbook:Silesian dumplings  Silesian dumplings

Silesian dumplings (Silesian: ślůnske kluski, gumiklyjzy, Silesian German: schläsche Kließla, Klöße, Polish: kluski śląskie) are potato dumplings very popular in Silesia. They are also popular in neighboring regions.

There are two major varieties: white dumplings and black dumplings, with quite different appearance and taste. The dumplings often feature a small hole or depression in the center.

The dish consisting of the dumplings, fried beef rouladen with rich gravy, and boiled red cabbage is (or used to be) an invariable component of the Sunday dinner in many traditional Silesian families. Left-over dumplings can be reheated or fried (like potatoes) for supper and eaten with left-over gravy or butter.

Preparation[edit]

The dough for white dumplings is made of mashed boiled potatoes (moderately cooled, but still warm), potato flour and wheat flour. The ratio of the two kinds of flour is about 3:1. In some recipes, a whole egg may be added to the dough [1] (this helps shaping if the mashed potatoes cooled too much and the shaping becomes problematic).

The dough for black dumplings is made of grated raw potatoes (the moisture removed by twisting in a linen cloth), roughly the same amount of mashed boiled potatoes, and the flour. In some recipes, a grated or chopped onion is added to the dough.

After hand rolling from the dough, the raw dumplings are flattened, and then the depression is made with a thumb.

The dumplings are cooked by inserting into boiling salty water in a large pot until they float to the top. If a larger number of dumplings is prepared, then the cooking must be done in batches (so that the dumpling do not glue together).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rose Petal Jam - Recipes and Stories from a Summer in Poland by Beata Zatorska and Simon Target, published by Tabula Books April 2011 [1]