Ada Township, Dickey County, North Dakota

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Ada Township, North Dakota
Township
Ada Township, North Dakota is located in North Dakota
Ada Township, North Dakota
Ada Township, North Dakota
Location within the state of North Dakota
Coordinates: 45°59′13″N 98°18′50″W / 45.98694°N 98.31389°W / 45.98694; -98.31389Coordinates: 45°59′13″N 98°18′50″W / 45.98694°N 98.31389°W / 45.98694; -98.31389
Country United States
State North Dakota
County Dickey
Area
 • Total 35.9 sq mi (92.9 km2)
 • Land 35.9 sq mi (92.9 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 1,375 ft (419 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 60
 • Density 1.7/sq mi (0.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 701
FIPS code 38-00300[1]
GNIS feature ID 1036744[2]

Ada is a township in Dickey County, North Dakota, United States. Its population during the 2000 Census was 60,[3] and was estimated at 52 in 2009.[4] Its population in 1900 was 232.[5]

History[edit]

Ada Township was first settled in the early 1880s. Originally part of Weston Township, which at the time covered two survey townships in Townships 129 and 130N, Range 61W.[6] Ada was organized around 1900 from the southern of the two townships and the northern one was renamed Kent Township.[5][7]

The village of Silverleaf, built in 1887, is located 7 miles east of Ellendale, and was once the major population center in the township.[7] The town reported around 25 residents in the late 1910s,[8] and never seemed to exceed more than 50. It is little more than a ghost town today.[9]

The village served a flag station for the Great Northern Railroad. Two conflicting stories exist over the origin of the name. Some say it is for the silverberry bushes found in the area,[9] but others attribute the naming to a joke played an early settler, Dan Keenan. Keenan reportedly removed the label from a tin of "Siverleaf" lard and nailed it to a boxcar parked at the station.[10]

Notable native[edit]

John E. Skogland (1879 – 1940) was a member of the North Dakota House of Representatives from 1925 to 1926.[7][11]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. Census 2000. "Census Demographic Profiles, Ada Township" (PDF). CenStats Databases. <http://censtats.census.gov/data/>. Retrieved 2009-01-31. 
  4. ^ U.S. Census Bureau (2010). "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions: North Dakota" (CSV). 2009 Population Estimates. Archived from the original on 27 June 2010. Retrieved 2010-06-22. 
  5. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau (1901). "Population of North Dakota" (PDF). Twelfth Census of the United States: 1900. Government Printing Office. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  6. ^ U.S. Census Bureau (1893). "Population of North Dakota" (PDF). Eleventh Census of the United States: 1890. Government Printing Office. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  7. ^ a b c Black, R. M., ed. (1930). A History of Dickey County, North Dakota. Ellendale, ND: Dickey County Historical Society. pp. 129–135 & 233. 
  8. ^ Clason's Guide to North Dakota. Clason's Pocket Guide Maps. Denver, Colorado: The Clason Map Co. 1917. p. 30. 
  9. ^ a b Wick, Douglas A. (1988). North Dakota Place Names. Bismarck, North Dakota: Hedemarken Collectibles. p. 179. ISBN 0-9620968-0-6. OCLC 191277027. 
  10. ^ Williams, Mary Ann (Barnes) (1966). Origins of North Dakota Place Names. Bismarck, North Dakota: Bismarck Tribune, 1966. p. 89. OCLC 431626. 
  11. ^ Dakota Lawmakers, North Dakota Legislative Council