Simon Yates (cyclist)

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Simon Yates
Simon Yates.jpg
Yates during the Glasgow event of the 2012–2013 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics season.
Personal information
Full name Simon Yates
Born (1992-08-07) 7 August 1992 (age 22)[1]
Bury, United Kingdom
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in)[1]
Weight 58 kg (128 lb; 9.1 st)[1]
Team information
Current team Orica-GreenEDGE
Discipline Track and road
Role Rider
Rider type Climber (road), Endurance (track)
Amateur team(s)
2013 100% Me
Professional team(s)
2014– Orica-GreenEDGE
Infobox last updated on
3 January 2014

Simon Yates (born 7 August 1992) is a British road and track racing cyclist and twin brother of Adam Yates. He currently competes for the Orica-GreenEDGE team.[2]

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

He won the gold medal in the points race at the 2013 Track World Championships.[3]

Simon made his breakthrough on the road in 2013 riding for the British national team. Along with brother Adam, he competed at the 2013 Tour de l'Avenir for the Great Britain national team, where Simon won the race's fifth stage, ahead of Adam.[4] Simon added another stage victory the following day,[5] and finished the race tenth overall.

He was then selected as part of the British national team to take part in the Tour of Britain. He competed well throughout the race and on stage six he took his biggest win to date, sprinting clear of a nine man group at the finish, which included Bradley Wiggins and Nairo Quintana.[6][7] Yates finished third overall in the Tour of Britain, and was the best rider in the under-23 classification.[8]

The brothers are not related to former cyclist Sean Yates.

Orica Greenedge (2014-)[edit]

Yates along with his brother joined the Australian UCI World Tour team Orica-GreenEDGE in 2014.[2] He finished 12th Overall in one of his first World Tour races, the Tour of the Basque Country. Yates suffered a broken collarbone on Stage 3 of the Tour of Turkey.[9] He was selected for the Orica Greenedge team for the 2014 Tour de France with only 5 days notice.

Palmarès[edit]

2010
Junior Track World Championships
1st Jersey rainbow.svg Madison (with Daniel McLay)
2nd Team pursuit
2011
1st Overall Twinings Pro-Am Tour
1st Stage 6 Tour de l'Avenir
9th Overall Thüringen Rundfahrt der U23
2013
1st Jersey rainbow.svg Points race, Track World Championships
3rd Overall Tour of Britain
1st Young rider classification
1st Stage 6
3rd La Côte Picarde
9th Overall An Post Rás
1st Young rider classification
10th Overall Tour de l'Avenir
1st Stages 5 & 6
10th Overall Thüringen Rundfahrt der U23
10th Overall Czech Cycling Tour
2014
3rd National Road Race Championships
7th Overall Tour of Slovenia
1st Jersey white.svg Young rider classification[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Simon Yates". Eurosport Australia. Retrieved 22 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Yates Brothers Confirm Move To Orica-GreenEdge". Cyclingnews.com (Future plc). 3 October 2013. Retrieved 3 October 2013. 
  3. ^ Bevan, Chris (22 February 2013). "Jason Kenny and Simon Yates win World cycling golds for Britain". BBC Sport. Minsk, Belarus: BBC. Retrieved 22 February 2013. 
  4. ^ "Simon Yates and brother Adam finish first and second on stage five of Tour de l'Avenir". Sky Sports (BSkyB). 29 August 2013. Retrieved 29 August 2013. 
  5. ^ "Simon Yates claims second successive Tour de l'Avenir win with victory on stage six". Sky Sports (BSkyB). 30 August 2013. Retrieved 31 August 2013. 
  6. ^ "Tour of Britain - Yates wins stage six, Wiggins maintains overall lead". Yahoo Eurosport. Retrieved 20 September 2013. 
  7. ^ "Tour of Britain: Simon Yates wins stage six, Bradley Wiggins leads". BBC Sport. Retrieved 1 October 2013. 
  8. ^ "Tour of Britain 2013, stage eight: Sir Bradley Wiggins triumphs after Mark Cavendish sprints to London victory". Telegraph Online. Retrieved 1 October 2013. 
  9. ^ http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/simon-yates-crashes-out-of-the-tour-of-turkey
  10. ^ Wynn, Nigel (23 June 2014). "Simon Yates claims best young rider jersey in Tour of Slovenia". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 24 June 2014. 

External links[edit]