Sinaloa de Leyva

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sinaloa de Leyva
Official seal of Sinaloa de Leyva
Seal
Sinaloa de Leyva is located in Mexico
Sinaloa de Leyva
Sinaloa de Leyva
Location in Mexico
Coordinates: 25°36′25″N 107°33′18″W / 25.60694°N 107.55500°W / 25.60694; -107.55500Coordinates: 25°36′25″N 107°33′18″W / 25.60694°N 107.55500°W / 25.60694; -107.55500
Country  Mexico
State Sinaloa
Municipality Sinaloa
Founded in 1583
Founded by Pedro de Montoya
Elevation 80 m (260 ft)
Population (2010)
 • Total 5,240
Time zone Mountain Standard Time (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) Mountain Daylight Time (UTC-6)
Website Official website

Sinaloa de Leyva (Spanish pronunciation: [sinaˈloa ðe ˈleiβa]) is a town in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. Its geographical location is 25°36′25″N 107°33′18″W / 25.60694°N 107.55500°W / 25.60694; -107.55500.

Sinaloa, Sin. was established as San Felipe y Santiago in 1585 by Antonio Ruiz, Bartolomé de Mondragón, Tomás de Soberanes, Juan Martínez del Castillo y Juan Caballero.[1] By 1590, Ruiz was its alcalde mayor, and it held nine people who eked out a living, but the situation improved through their discovery of the mines of Chínipas, and the arrival of the Jesuits in 1591.[2] At the end of the sixteenth century, Ruiz wrote his history where he detailed the early history of San Felipe y Santiago, and Sinaloa.

This was the base for Diego de Hurdaide's subjugation of the Sinaloas, Tehuecos, Ahomes and Zuaques and the extension of Spanish control over the Fuerte River valley, and thus to the northern edge of modern Sinaloa.[3]

Sinaloa, Sin. serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality (municipio) of Sinaloa, Sinaloa. The municipality reported 88,282 inhabitants in the 2010 census. It is the former capital of the Mexican state of Sinaloa.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [La conquista de Sinaloa: La relación de Antonio Ruiz edited by Antonio Nakayama (Culiacan, Mexico: COBAES/CEHNO, A.C., 1992), iii.]
  2. ^ [Nakayama, iii.]
  3. ^ Edward H. Spicer, Cycles of Conquest (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1962), p. 46-47

External links[edit]