Sinbad (musical)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the 1891 musical of the same name, see Sinbad (1891 musical)
Sinbad
Sinbad.jpg
Sheet music cover (cropped)
Music Sigmund Romberg
Lyrics Harold R. Atteridge
Book Harold R. Atteridge
Productions 1918 Broadway

Sinbad is a Broadway musical with a book and lyrics by Harold R. Atteridge and music by Sigmund Romberg, Al Jolson and others. Jolson plays a porter in old Bagdad where he meets a series of characters from the Arabian Nights, including Sinbad. He is transported to various exotic settings.

The musical was produced by Lee Shubert and J. J. Shubert and staged by J. C. Huffman and J. J. Shubert. After a tryout in New Haven, Connecticut, the Broadway production opened on February 14, 1918 at the Winter Garden Theatre, where it ran for 164 performances. The cast included Jolson (in blackface), Kitty Doner, Constance Farber and Forrest Huff. This show was a “musical comedy” with little purpose other than to provide a vehicle for Jolson, who sang specialty songs that were written for him by himself and others, while Romberg's songs held the show together. As with Jolson’s previous shows, songs were interpolated during the run and for the national tour, which ran for nearly two years.[1][2]

Synopsis[edit]

At a Long Island country club, Nan Van Decker, a wealthy socialite, struggles to choose which of two men to entrust with a financial matter. She consults a crystal ball, and the ball reveals to her exotic Arabian scenes and people, including Inbad the porter and a middle-eastern version of the Long Island valet, Gus. Fantasy sequences follow, and Inbad meets a series of characters from the Arabian Nights, including Sinbad the Sailor.

Songs[edit]

Music by Romberg and lyrics by Atteridge, except as otherwise indicated:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Everett, William A. and Geoffrey Holden Block. "Finding a Voice: Operetta, Revue and Musical Comedy", Sigmund Romberg, p. 63, Yale University Press, 2007 ISBN 0300138350
  2. ^ "Jolson on Stage!", The Museum of Family History, 2008, accessed November 18, 2013

External links[edit]