Sinclair Oxford

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Sinclair Oxford
Sinclair Oxford 300.jpg
Sinclair Oxford 300 calculator
Type Scientific calculator
Manufacturer Sinclair Radionics
Introduced Spring 1975
Discontinued Date of discontinuation
Calculator
Display Type Light-emitting diode/ Vacuum fluorescent display (Type 1s used the LED and Type 2s the VFD)[1]
Display Size 8 digits
Programming
Other
Power supply PP3 battery
Weight 138 grams (Oxford 300 excluding batteries)[2]
Dimensions 73 by 155 by 34 millimetres (2.9 × 6.1 × 1.3 in)

Sinclair Oxford was a range of low-cost scientific calculators manufactured and sold by Sinclair Radionics in England from 1975 until 1976.

History[edit]

In November 1974, Gillette wanted to enter the consumer electronics market, so consulted Sinclair, who designed for them the Gillette GPA.[3] Whilst the GPA was released, Gillette put the product on hold after a short time due to economic and pricing uncertainties.[3] Sinclair would use the GPA design for the Oxford range, the development and tooling of which had been paid for by Gillette.[3]

The first model was the Oxford 100, launched in Spring 1975 for GB£12.95 (all prices exclude VAT); and essentially the same as the GPA.[3][4] Both the Gillette GPA and Oxford 100 models used 8 digit displays with red light-emitting diodes (LEDs), 4 functions, 9 volt PP3 batteries, and measured 73 by 155 by 34 millimetres (2.9 × 6.1 × 1.3 in).[4]

Models[edit]

All the Oxford models were similar in appearance; the 150 was introduced in 1975 introducing the ability to calculate percentages and square roots.[3][5] The Oxford 200 included memory and sold for £19.95.[3] The Oxford 300 was a scientific model with a limited number of functions (such as sin, cos, tan), which sold for £29.95, much lower than the competition.[3][6] The last two models, the Oxford Scientific (1976) and Oxford Universal were the most advanced of the range.[3]

The high power consumption of the calculators, which drew 40 mA when in operation, four times the recommended limit of the batteries, meant a short battery life. Computer Digest recommend using a much larger PP9 battery, but that meant losing the portability of the calculator.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Oxford". Vintage Sinclair. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "Sinclair Oxford 300 (Type II)". vintage-technology.info. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Sinclair Oxford 1975-76". Planet Sinclair. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Gillette GPA / Sinclair Oxford 100". vintagecalculators.com. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Sinclair Oxford 150". vintagecalculators.com. Retrieved 8 December 2013. 
  6. ^ "Sinclair Oxford Scientific Calculator". tvfilmprops.co.uk. Retrieved 8 December 2013.