Sines

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Coordinates: 37°55′48″N 8°46′12″W / 37.93000°N 8.77000°W / 37.93000; -8.77000
Sines
Municipality (Concelho)
Sines06 edit1.jpg
A monument to Vasco da Gama who was christened in the parish church of Sines, and whose father was the alcade-mor of the castle
Flag
Coat of arms
Official name: Concelho de Sines
Name origin: sines, Portuguese for bells; alternatively, the name of a clan of Visigoths, Cinetos, later Cines and, finally, Sines
Country  Portugal
Region Alentejo
Subregion Alentejo Litoral
District Setúbal
Civil Parishes Porto Covo, Sines
Center Courela da Calraia
 - elevation 49 m (161 ft)
 - coordinates 37°55′48″N 8°46′12″W / 37.93000°N 8.77000°W / 37.93000; -8.77000
Lowest point Sea level
 - location Atlantic Ocean
 - elevation 0 m (0 ft)
Length 16.17 km (10 mi), West-East
Width 27.26 km (17 mi), North-South
Area 203.3 km2 (78 sq mi)
Population 14,260 (2011 Increase)
Density 70.14 / km2 (182 / sq mi)
Settlement fl. 1300
 - Municipality c.1362
LAU Câmara Municipal
 - location Largo Ramos Costa
 - coordinates 37°57′17″N 8°51′52″W / 37.95472°N 8.86444°W / 37.95472; -8.86444
President Manuel Coelho Carvalho (Sines Intressa Mais (SIM))
Municipal Chair José Luís Martins Batalha (PS)
Timezone WET (UTC0)
 - summer (DST) WEST (UTC-1)
Postal Zone 7520-159
Area Code & Prefix (+351) 286 XXX XXX
Municipal Holidays 24 November
Location of the municipality of Sines in continental Portugal
Wikimedia Commons: Sines
Statistics: Instituto Nacional de Estatística[1]
Website: http://www.cm-sines.pt/
Geographic detail from CAOP (2010)[2] produced by Instituto Geográfico Português (IGP)

Sines (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈsinɨʃ]) is a coastal municipality in the district of Setúbal, in the Alentejo Litoral region of the Portuguese Alentejo. Its population in 2011 was over 14260 residents, with a total area of 203.3 km². The Port of Sines is the largest artificial port of Portugal.

History[edit]

The ancient centre of Sines: the castle was initiated as protection from pirates in 1362

Vestiges of a few settlements have today been discovered in archaeological sites, such as Palmeirinha and Quitéria, that attest to the age of human settlements in Sines.[3] Arnaldo Soledade (1981) noted that these Visigoths, identified as Cinetos, may have been the original civilization that gave rise to the community, suggesting the local toponymy may have derived from this; Cinetos, to Cines and, finally, Sines.[4] Although this tribes lineage is not clearly defined, Soledade goes on to refer to the construction of a castro where the current Castle stands. The Punic tribes, are thought to have also had a presence in the area; a Punic artifact, the Tesouro do Gaio was unearthed in 1966, and is on guard in the Museu of Sines (English: Sines Museum). Discovered in May 1966, the treasure was unearthed by a local farmer, Francisco da Silva Campos, who was tilling his land to plant corn, and discovered a schist tomb with women's jewellery in his plot of land in Herdade do Gaio (12.5 km south-east of Sines, 7 km from the coast and 275m from Ribeira de Morgavel). Between 1966 and 1967, investigator José Miguel da Costa, discovered several of these Punic graves, but all showing evidence of early tomb raiding. While the jewellery was determined to be Punic in origin, the symbolism on the artefacts were characterized as Egyptian.[5] On the island of Pessegueiro, there is also evidence of Ibero-Punic artefacts discovered under the Roman port, discovered by archeologists Carlos Tavares da Silva and Joaquina Soares (1981).[6] Roman occupation brought the destruction of many of these artefacts associated with the Iron Age.

The Romans used Sines as a port and industrial centre; the bay of Sines was used as port by the civitas of Miróbriga and the canal on the island of Pessegueiro is linked to Arandis (Garvão). During Rome's occupation, Sines and the island of Pessegueiro, were poles within an industrialized fishing industry which included salting fish. The Roman centres were thought to have been at Praça Tómas Ribeiro, as well as the area around Monte Chaos in Feteira Cima (although little explored archaeologically). In the fields of Quitéria, Carlos Tavares da Silva and Joaquina Soares (1981) investigated the remains of a 1st-century villa, where the remnants of cobblestone streets and a hypocaust were discovered. In 1961, José Miguel da Costa, during excavations around the Castle of Sines, discovered Roman "fishing factories", and a ceramics kiln to produce amphorae for salted fish, both dating back to the 1st and 2nd centuries. Sine's toponymy is also Roman in origin, but may refer to two terms (both applicable): the term sinus, which means bay; or an alternate meaning for curve, and may refer to the curvature of the Sines Cape, as seen from Monte Chãos.

Middle Ages[edit]

Battlements along the south wall of the Castle of Sines
The Revelim Fort, the 17th Century fort used for the protection from pirates
The old quarter of Sines, showing an example of the older architecture

During the Middle Ages, the area of Sines was occupied by the Visigoths and later sacked by Moors. There are many more examples of Visigoth-era carved stones (7th century) throughout Sines.[7] Evidence from an archaeological excavation of the Sines castle discovered that many of the walls of the old building were constructed from the rocks used in the construction of Roman-era monuments, such as a portion of a pedestal of a statue of Mars (which was assumed to have been part of a larger square in the Roman town before the construction of the basilica).[8] The basilica itself likely existed on the site of the current Matriz Church, whose baptistery is of Visigothic origin. The Moors likely sacked the settlement in the 7th century; this marked a period of decline in the area, indicating a period when the ancient settlement was abandoned. Yet, although the few inhabitants lived in the zone, Moorish ships regularly patrolled the waters, until the 13th century, when Afonso III conquered the region.

The area regained much of its importance at the beginning of the 8th century, when fishermen returned to the waters around Sines. Re-settlement along the coast was initiated by the Order of Santiago da Espada, who administered the lands under the reign of Afonso III. Sines obtained administrative autonomy from Santiago do Cacém on 24 November 1362, when Pedro I elevated Sines to the status of villa. He later preoccupied himself with the coastal defense of the region, establishing the conditions for the construction of Sine's Castle, already protected by elements of the Visigothic wall. The castle in Sines was constructed during the first half of the 15th century. Like Setúbal, but contrary to what happened in Santiago do Cacém or Palmela, the castle was constructed to defend the wealth of the local merchants, indicating a new economic and social order, with the ascension of the bourgeoisie.[9]

Monarchy[edit]

During the Portuguese Interregnum and 1383–1385 Crisis, the bourgeoisie and nobles of Sines were one of the municipalities that supported the Master of the Order of Aviz, the later King John I of Portugal in his battle for the throne. In 1395, aggravated by the fact the castle was not completed, King John appropriated men to serve in the military campaigns along the frontier. But, much of the concern during this period was from attacks by pirates, and compulsory military service was seen as bulwark against the region's collapse. In 1511, Sines was attacked by a large band of pirates. The King, who was careful to indemnity the losses, established a small base of three ships in Sines and Sesimbra to combat these French privateers. By the end of the 16th century, as threats from the coast increased, so too were the fortifications along the coast. This included the establishment of a fort alongside the Chapel of Senhora das Salas (Fort of Revelim), and two forts on the island of Pessegueiro. In 1629, as the construction of the Revelim Fort proceeded, Turkish pirates attacked and sank a nau in the port of Sines. A Sesimbrense captain, though, was successful in capturing a pirate ship in the bay by 1648.

At the end of the 16th century, commanded by Filippo Terzi, in the service of Philip II of Portugal, it was thought that the construction of a new port on Pessegueiro would motivate growth. Problems during construction, and frequent raids by English privateers, caused the project to be abandoned: the remnants on Pessegueiro include great blocks of rock that were quarried to make way for the project. In the last decade of the 18th century, the natural anchorage seduced Jacinto Fernandes Bandeira, a merchant, to found Porto Covo, with the hope that his initiative would convince others to establish complimentary businesses and a grand port.

In the second half of the 19th century, pyrite from Pias and Moinho dos Paneiros (Sines) and ore from Cercal are transported from the small island. The ore arrived in carts pulled by bulls, transported over a large bridge, and by boats to larger ships on the island. Near the mouth of the ravine on Pessegueiro there still remain abandoned deposits of accumulated ore, that were never transported.

During the first decade of the 19th century, the populous of Sines lived in fear during the French occupation of the country. In one incident, a company of troops from Napoleon's army pillaged the town and defaced the royal coat-of-arms over the doors to the castle.

Under the Liberalist Constitution, the municipality began to govern its own affairs, as the Order of Santiago, along with other religious orders were expelled from Portugal in 1855, and most of their assets appropriated. Sines became a parish of Santiago do Cacém, losing autonomy, yet flourished economically as several new businesses began operating from the town. The establishment of cork and canning industries, small factories producing distillates and artisan goods (bakeries and cobblers), turned the village more attractive to emigrants. The town attracted many English and Catalan businesses, as well as Alentejan and Algarvan entrepreneurs in search of work.

Entrepreneurial growth and republican idealism helped to redevelop the area, as the construction of new roads, the arrival of a rail-line, access to schools and culture became cumulative. The new elites, not only built their wealth on land rental, but also industry and commerce, and showed renewed interest in restoring the municipality. These liberal elites, such as João Daniel de Sines, fought for the constitutional monarchy during the Liberal Wars, and were magnanimous when former-King Miguel of Portugal stopped-over in their region on his way to exile.

At the end of the 19th century, a young Algarvian medic would write the first monograph on Sines, Breve Noticia de Sines (English: A Brief Notice on Sines). Francisco Luís Lopes' work was an acidic critique of municipal affairs and living conditions that were both sincere and damning, but also flattering and praise-worthy, noting both the villa's problems and its openness and tolerance.[10]

Republic[edit]

The year 1914 marked a period of renewed interest and the restoration of the municipality. The cork industry, the fishery, some agriculture and tourism marked a period of economic activity that lasted until the end of the 1960s, when, apart from its proximity to the sea, Sines was indistinguishable from other communities in the Alentejo. Sines was the beach for many of the local residents of the Alentejo, visited by the rural families of Beja and Santiago do Cacém.

Until the early 1970s, Sines was a sheltered fishing village with a long commercial history of relations with cities in the Mediterranean; its large marina, along a breakwater, is the only marina between Setúbal and the Algarve, while the deep-sea port, commercial fishery and industrial depot have drive the economy of this area. In 1970, the government of Marcello Caetano initiated the grande industrial-port complex that would, along with the 1974 Revolution, energize the local economy. Consequently, the population exploded, while industry and commerce diversified, causing their own impacts. In the late 1970s, the arrival of immigrants and refugees from the Portuguese overseas provinces brought new social dynamics, which were later supplemented by foreign workers employed in the port and petrochemical industry.

Geography[edit]

Physical geography[edit]

The lower coast of the coastal plain that stretches from Sines to Setúbal
The landscape in the eastern plain, near Porto Covo

The municipalities territory is distinguished by three morphological structures: a coastal plain, the residual relief of the Sines Massif, and the eastern escarpment.

  • The coastal plan (which occupies the major part of the municipality) slopes gradually from the interior and occupies an area of 3-12 kilometres cut by several water courses.
  • Little remains of the Sines Massif, but from Monte Chãos to the Cape, there are elements of its morphology still present: the Sines promontory is relatively elevated from the sea, and limited by an abrupt escarpment, which slopes to the south until the Ribeira da Junqueira., where beaches and dunes predominate. But after the beach of Burrinho, it continues to be rugged until the vicinity of the island Pessegueiro, where beaches are also evident, while sheltered coves and mini-beaches, such as Porto Covinho, are inter-cut along the coastline. From the north of the city the coast is low sandy beach that extends to Tróia. From this coast, extensive dunes, particularly north of the mouth of Ribeira dos Moinhos dominate the landforms.
  • The eastern escarpment, which is limited by the coastal plain forms part of the Serra do Cercal Massif (which rises 100–200 meters in altitude).

The coast, which is physically rugged (the Sines Cape) is separated into two differentiated areas: a sandy northern section, and a rocky southern area of cliffs.

Human geography[edit]

Population of the
Municipality of Sines
(1801 - 2011)[1]
Year Pop.   ±%  
1801 1,766 —    
1849 2,632 +49.0%
1930 7,666 +191.3%
1960 8,866 +15.7%
1981 12,075 +36.2%
1991 12,347 +2.3%
2001 13,577 +10.0%
2004 13,613 +0.3%
2011 14,260 +4.8%

Sines is limited on its southern frontier by Odemira Municipality, north and northeast by Santiago do Cacém Municipality, while the southern part of the municipality (south of São Torpes) is part of the Parque Natural do Sudoeste Alentejano e Costa Vicentina (English: St. Vincent and Southwest Alentejo Coast Natural Park). A small part of the north also belongs to the Reserva Natural da Lagoa de Santo André e da Sancha (English: Natural Reserves of Lake Saint Andre and Sancha). Sines is 150 kilometers south of Lisbon.

Sines Municipality was constituted, until 1485, from the parishes of Sines, Colos and the area that today corresponds to the parish of Vila Nova do Milfontes. In 1485, King D. John II, with the objective of settling the area of coastal Alentejo, created the municipality of Vila Nova de Milfontes, and included the area of Cercal. Colos also became a municipality in 1499, restricting Sines to its present area.

In 1855, along with other municipalities, Sines ceased to exist and became integrated into Santiago do Cacém as the parish of São Salvador. Although it lost its autonomy, the settlements flourished for a time; Sines regained its autonomy in 1914.

Administratively, the municipality is divided into 2 civil parishes (freguesias):[11]

  • Porto Covo - the tourist-centered parish, along the southern frontier of Sines, settled by Jacinto Fernandes Bandeira, to motivate settlement at the end of the 18th century, has grown to include 1400 annual inhabitants;
  • Sines - the main parish and town within the municipality, with a population of 15000. Not self-governing.

Economy[edit]

The economy of Sines municipality depends on energy, oil refining, port activity, fishing, tourism and trade. The municipality has an important investment park managed by AICEP Global Parques, and a science park, the Sines Tecnopolo.

Sines is the location of one of the largest maritime-industrial complexes in Portugal, whose tenants include Sines Power Plant (Electricidade de Portugal), Petrogal Sines (National Petrochemic Refinery) and Repsol (Polymer Refinery). Although rapidly industrializing, the town still preserves many of the historical landmarks and tries to cater to tourism. The nearby village of Porto Covo attracts many tourists owing to its coastline and the well-preserved historical buildings.

There is a large shortwave broadcasting station at Sines. The most remarkable antenna towers are the rotatable towers looking like a big "V". [1] [2]. It was used by Deutsche Welle and was switched off on November 1, 2011.

Architecture[edit]

The front façade of the Matriz Church of Sines
The simple façade of the Church of Porto Covo

Civic[edit]

  • A Primorosa (Portuguese: Loja A Primorosa)
  • Arts Centre of Sines (Portuguese: Centro de Artes de Sines)
  • Cinema/Theatre Vasco da Gama (Portuguese: Cine-Teatro Vasco da Gama)
  • Customs Delegation of Sines (Portuguese: Delegação Aduaneira de Sines)
  • Emmérico Nunes Cultural Centre (Portuguese: Hospital da Misericórdia/Hospital do Espírito Santo/Centro Cultural Emmérico Nunes)
  • Fountain of D. Bataça (Portuguese: Chafariz de D. Bataça)
  • Fountain of Caminho das Bicas (Portuguese: Chafariz do Caminho das Bicas)
  • Lighthouse of Sines (Portuguese: Farol de Sines)
  • Pidwell Residence/Palace (Portuguese: Casa Pidwell/Palácio Pidwell)
  • Railroad Station of Sines (Portuguese: Estação Ferroviária de Sines)
  • Ravine Warehouses (Portuguese: Armazéns da Ribeira)
  • Statue of Vasco da Gama (Portuguese: Estatua de Vasco da Gama)
  • Windmill of Monte Chãos (Portuguese: Moinho de Vento de Monte Chãos)
  • Wine Cellar of Sines (Portuguese: Adega de Sines)

Military[edit]

  • Castle of Sines (Portuguese: Castelo de Sines)
  • Cross of São Torpes (Portuguese: Cruzeiro de São Torpes)
  • Fort of Pessegueiro (Portuguese: Forte do Pessegueiro)
  • Fort of Pessegueiro Island (Portuguese: Forte de Ilha do Pessegueiro)
  • Fort of Revelim (Portuguese: Forte de Nossa Senhora das Salas/Forte de Nossa Senhora das Salvas/Forte do Revelim)

Religious[edit]

  • Chapel of the Misericórdia (Portuguese: Capela da Misericórdia)
  • Church of Porto Covo (Portuguese: Igreja de Porto Covo)
  • Church of São Salvador (Portuguese: Igreja Matriz de São Salvador)
  • Hermitage of Nossa Senhora dos Remédios (Portuguese: Ermida de Nossa Senhora dos Remédios)
  • Hermitage of Nossa Senhora das Salas (Portuguese: Ermida da Nossa Senhora das Salas)
  • Hermitage of São Bartolomeu (Portuguese: Ermida de São Bartolomeu)
  • (Old) Hermitage of São Sebastião (Portuguese: Ermida Velha de São Sebastião/Igreja Evangélica)

Culture[edit]

Festivals[edit]

Every summer, the town hosts the FMM Sines - Festival Músicas do Mundo, a world music festival that brings thousands of enthusiasts and musicians from all continents.

Notable citizens[edit]

  • João Daniel de Sines, O Raspalhista,[12] GColTE (c. February 1809 - 19 April 1878; Lisbon) - a liberalist sympathizer and hero of the Liberal Wars, he would go on to fame for his medical knowledge and contributions during cholera (1856) and yellow-fever (1857) outbreaks, as well as his attacks on the royalist medicine and power of the Catholic Church, founding the Sociedade Humanitariana Raspalhista and publishing various articles in O Portuguez and O Patriota.
  • Vasco da Gama, 1st Count of Vidigueira (c.1460 or 1469 – 24 December 1524; Kochi, India) - was a Portuguese explorer and the commander of the first ships to India; for a short time (in 1524) he was Governor of Portuguese India. He was born at the castle where his father Estêvão da Gama was the local alcalde, and following his return from India, was given feudal rights over Sines.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b INE, ed. (2010), Censos 2011 - Resultadas Preliminares [2011 Census - Preliminary Results] (in Portuguese), Lisbon, Portugal: Instituto Nacional de Estatística, retrieved 1 July 2011 
  2. ^ IGP, ed. (2010), Carta Administrativa Oficial de Portugal (in Portuguese), Lisbon, Portugal: Instituto Geográfico Português, retrieved 1 July 2011 
  3. ^ Carlos Tavares da Silva and Joaquina Soares, 1981
  4. ^ Arnaldo Soledade, 1981
  5. ^ Some earrings show the figure of Hathor and a signet of marble, amulet, is engraved in relief with a scarab associated with Thutmose III, with the eye of Horus, the Son God.
  6. ^ Carlos Tavares da Silva and Joaquina Soares, 1993
  7. ^ Fernando Almeida, 1970
  8. ^ José d´Encarnação, 2009
  9. ^ Carlos Tavares da Silva and Joaquina Soares, 1998, p.21-44
  10. ^ Francisco Luís Lopes, 1850
  11. ^ Diário da República. "Law nr. 11-A/2013, page 552 115" (pdf) (in Portuguese). Retrieved 31 July 2014. 
  12. ^ João Daniel received his nickname, O Raspalhista, for his adherence to Medical practices and republican ideology of the French medic François-Vincent Raspail, who was notable for theories on cells, proponent of the use of microscopes, antiseptics, better sanitation and diet.
Sources
  • Almeida, Fernando (1970). "Sines visigótica". Arquivo de Beja [Visigothic Sines]. XXV-XXVII. Beja,Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Beja. pp. pp. 17–29. 
  • d´Encarnação, José. "Em Torno da Inscrição a Marte, de Sines". 1º Encontro de História do Alentejo Litoral, edição das actas (in Portuguese). Sines, Portugal: Centro Cultural Emmerico Nunes. pp. 40–43. ISBN 978-972-99027-5-8. 
  • Silva, Carlos Tavares da; Soares, Joaquina (1981). Pré-História na Área de Sines:Trabalhos arqueologicos de 1972-77 [Pre-History in the Area of Sines: Archeological works in 1972-1977] (in Portuguese). Lisbon, Portugal: Gabinete de Área de Sines. 
  • Silva, Carlos Tavares da; Soares, Joaquina (1993). Ilha do Pessegueiro, Porto Romano da Costa Alentejana [Pessegueiro Island: Roman Port on the Alentejo Coast] (in Portuguese). Lisbon, Portugal: Gabinete de Área de Sines. ISBN 972-40-3413-3. 
  • Silva, Carlos Tavares da; Soares, Joaquina (1998). "Para uma arqueologia do castelo de Sines". Da ocidental praia lusitana: Vasco da Gama e o seu tempo [The Western Coast of Lusitana: Vasco da Gama and His Time] (in Portuguese). Lisbon, Portugal: Comissão Nacional para as Comemorações dos Descobrimentos Portugueses. pp. 21–44. 
  • Soledade, Arnaldo (1981). Sines, terra de Vasco da Gama [Sines: Land of Vasco da Gama] (in Portuguese) (2nd ed.). Sines, Portugal: Câmara Municipal de Sines. 
  • Lopes, Francisco Luiz (1859). Breve noticia de Sines, patria de Vasco da Gama [A Brief Note on Sines: Homeland of Vasco da Gama] (in Portuguese). Lisbon, Portugal: Typographia do Panorama. p. 124. 

External links[edit]