Sinfonia Concertante (Haydn)

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The Sinfonia Concertante in B-flat major (Hob. I/105), by Joseph Haydn was composed in London between February and March 1792.[1] The work is a sinfonia concertante with four instruments in the solo group: violin, cello, oboe and bassoon. It is believed to be a response to similar works composed by Ignaz Pleyel, a former student of Haydn's who London newspapers were promoting as a 'rival' to Haydn.[2]

Background[edit]

The composition was written during the first of the composer's two visits to London. It is believed that Johann Peter Salomon asked Haydn to compose the work because of the success of similar works written by Pleyel and performed in a rival concert series.[1][3]

Manuscript evidence indicates that the work was written in some haste and Haydn is known to have complained of eyestrain while working on it.[2][3][4]

The first performance was given on 9 March 1792, with Salomon as lead violinist in the solo group.[2][3][5] The other members of the solo group are only known by their surnames, Harrington (Oboe), Holmes (Bassoon) and Menel (Cello).[3][5] The performance was highly successful and not only was the work encored the following week, it was performed again during Haydn's 1794 visit to London with equal success.[2]

Structure[edit]

There are three movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Finale: Allegro con spirito

A typical performance will take between 21 to 25 minutes.

References[edit]

Notes
Sources

External links[edit]