Singer railway station

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Singer National Rail
Singer
Location
Place Clydebank
Local authority West Dunbartonshire
Coordinates 55°54′27″N 4°24′20″W / 55.9075°N 4.4055°W / 55.9075; -4.4055Coordinates: 55°54′27″N 4°24′20″W / 55.9075°N 4.4055°W / 55.9075; -4.4055
Grid reference NS497708
Operations
Station code SIN
Managed by First ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2002/03 0.484 million
2004/05 0.539 million
2005/06 0.632 million
2006/07 0.621 million
2007/08 0.683 million
2008/09 0.713 million
2009/10 0.669 million
2010/11 0.685 million
Passenger Transport Executive
PTE Strathclyde Partnership for Transport
History
Original company Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway
Pre-grouping North British Railway
Post-grouping LNER
3 November 1907 Opened
c.1942 Singer Workers' Platforms opened
8 May 1967 Singer Workers' Platforms closed
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Singer from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
Portal icon UK Railways portal

Singer railway station is a two-platformed manned station serving Clydebank town centre, West Dunbartonshire, Scotland. It is located on the Argyle Line, 7 12 miles (12.1 km) west of Glasgow Central and the North Clyde Line, 8½ miles (13 km) west of Glasgow Queen Street.

Passenger services are provided by First ScotRail on behalf of Strathclyde Partnership for Transport.

History[edit]

Singer station took its name from the huge Singer sewing machine factory that it was built to serve.[1][2][3] The station is located on a section of track that was realigned to make space for the factory. In addition to this station (still in use today), the original station - titled Singer Works, previously called Kilbowie Road (Old), once boasted six bay platforms for the many workers' trains that ran there. The bay platforms, and indeed the factory, have long since gone.[3][4]

Services[edit]

An Argyle Line service

Singer is served by trains on the half-hourly, all day Monday to Saturdays, on both the Argyle and North Clyde lines. This means Monday to Saturday there is a train every 15 minutes to central Glasgow.

On Sundays, there is a half-hourly service to Glasgow Queen Street served by trains on the North Clyde Line.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Drumry   First ScotRail
Argyle Line
  Dalmuir
Drumry   First ScotRail
North Clyde Line
  Dalmuir
Historical railways
Drumchapel   North British Railway
Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway
  Dalmuir

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Clydebank Story - Transport". Retrieved 2008-02-11. 
  2. ^ McIntosh Gray and Moffat (1989)
  3. ^ a b Butt (1995): Page 212
  4. ^ "Aerial view of Singer". Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0508-1. OCLC 60251199. 
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0086-1. OCLC 22311137. 
  • Yonge, John (May 1987). Gerald Jacobs, ed. British Rail Track Diagams - Book 1: ScotRail (1st edition ed.). Exeter: Quail Map Company. ISBN 0-9006-0948-6. 
  • Yonge, John (February 1993). Gerald Jacobs, ed. Railway Track Diagams - Book 1: Scotland and the Isle of Man (2nd edition ed.). Exeter: Quail Map Company. ISBN 0-9006-0995-8. 
  • Yonge, John (April 1996). Gerald Jacobs, ed. Railway Track Diagams - Book 1: Scotland and the Isle of Man (3rd edition ed.). Exeter: Quail Map Company. ISBN 1-8983-1919-7. 
  • Yonge, John (2007). Gerald Jacobs, ed. Railway Track Diagams - Book 1: Scotland & Isle of Man (Quail Track Plans) (fifth edition ed.). Bradford on Avon: "Trackmaps (formerly Quail Map Co)". . ISBN 978-0-9549866-3-6. OCLC 79435248. 
  • McIntosh Gray, Alastair and Moffat, William (1989). A History of Scotland. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-917063-0.

External links[edit]