Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue

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A collection of essays by physician-writer Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD.[1] Singular Intimacies: Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue is the story of medical training in America’s oldest public hospital.[2] Ofri writes of the experience of being an untested medical student, pitched from academia into Bellevue Hospital, eventually making it to the other side as a doctor.

The essay Merced from this book was chosen by Stephen Jay Gould for Best American Essays 2002,[3] and was also awarded the Editor's Prize for Nonfiction by The Missouri Review.[4]

Ofri is a practicing internist at Bellevue Hospital and the editor-in-chief of the Bellevue Literary Review.[5] She is also the author of Incidental Findings: Lessons from my Patients in the Art of Medicine. [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ofri, Danielle (2003-04-15). Singular Intimacies Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue. Beacon Press. ISBN 978-0-8070-7252-3. 
  2. ^ "Bellevue Hospital Center". Archived from the original on 2011-11-11. Retrieved 2007-10-26. 
  3. ^ Ofri, Danielle (2002). "Merced". Best American Essays 2002: 237–252. 
  4. ^ "Previous Contest Winners". The Missouri Review. 2004-09-21. Archived from the original on 2007-10-12. Retrieved 2007-10-26. 
  5. ^ "Bellevue Literary Review". Archived from the original on 2007-10-10. Retrieved 2007-10-25. 
  6. ^ Ofri, Danielle (2006-04-15). Incidental Findings Lessons From My Patients in the Art of Medicine. Beacon Press. ISBN 978-0-8070-7267-7. 

External links[edit]