Sir Fitzroy Maclean, 8th Baronet

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Sir Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton Maclean, 8th Baronet, 4th Lord Maclean and 24th Clan Chief
Born Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton Maclean
c. 1770
Died 5 July 1847(1847-07-05) (aged 77)
Title 4th Lord Maclean
24th Clan Chief
8th Baronet
Term 1818–1847
Predecessor Sir Hector Maclean, 7th Baronet
Successor Sir Charles Fitzroy Maclean, 9th Baronet
Spouse(s) Elizabeth Kidd
Parents Donald Maclean of Brolas
Relatives Sir Hector Maclean, 7th Baronet, brother

Sir Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton Maclean, 8th Baronet of Morvern (c. 1770 – 5 July 1847) 24th Clan Chief of Clan Maclean from 1818 to 1847. He succeeded his half brother, Sir Hector Maclean, 7th Baronet, when Hector died in 1818 without an heir.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

He was the half brother of Sir Hector Maclean, 7th Baronet.[3] Both Hector and Fitzroy were the sons of Donald Maclean of Brolas who was married first to Mary Dickson, and later to Margaret Wall(?). Fitzroy is the son from the second marriage. Donald Maclean was the great grandson of Donald MacLean, 1st Laird of Brolas through Brolas' son Hector.[1]

On 24 September 1787, he obtained his commission as ensign in the twenty-ninth regiment, and rapidly rose to the rank of General, passing through the following grades: Lieutenant, 19 June 1788; Captain, 15 July 1793 ; Major, March, 1795; Lieutenant-Colonel, 18 November 1795; Colonel, 25 September 1803; Major-General, 25 July. 1810; Lieutenant- General, 4 June 1814; General, 10 January 1837. In 1793, he was at the capture of the island of Tobago and in the attack on Martinique. In 1803. he was appointed commandant of the Batavians, who were received into the British service on the surrender of the Dutch West India colonies. In the expedition for the capture of Surinam, he commanded the advanced corps of the army. In 1805, he was at the capture of the Danish islands of St. Thomas and St. John, the government of which was conferred upon him in 1808, and continued as such until 1815. His administration of the affairs of those islands, his impartial conduct, mild sway, and kind disposition, were such as to endear him to all classes of the inhabitants, and when he took his departure, it was amidst the universal regret of the people. For his gallant behavior at the capture of the island of Gaudaloupe, in 1810, he received and was permitted to wear a medal. In June, 1815, he returned to Europe, after passing, with very little interval, a period of twenty-eight years on active service in the hot climate of the West Indies. On his return he resided chiefly in London. In 1814, he married the widow of John Bishop of Barbados, the only child of Charles Kidd, and by her had several children, all of whom died in childhood except Sir Charles Fitzroy Maclean, 9th Baronet and Donald Maclean. His wife died in 1832, he married, 17 September 1838, Frances, widow of Henry Campion, of Sussex county. Sir Fitzroy J. G. MacLean died 5 July 1847.[3]

Ancestors[edit]

Sir Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton Maclean, 8th Baronet's ancestors in three generations
Sir Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton Maclean, 8th Baronet Father:
Donald Maclean of Brolas
Paternal Grandfather:
John Maclean of Brolas
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Hector Og Maclean of Brolas
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Janet Macneil of Barra
Paternal Grandmother:
Finovia of Garmony
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Paternal Great-Grandmother:
Mother:
Margaret Wall of Clonea Castle
Maternal Grandfather:
James Wall of Clonea Castle
Maternal Great-Grandfather:
Maternal Great-Grandmother:
Maternal Grandmother:
Maternal Great-grandfather:
Maternal Great-Grandmother:

References[edit]

 This article incorporates text from A history of the clan Mac Lean from its first settlement at Duard Castle, in the Isle of Mull, to the present period: including a genealogical account of some of the principal families together with their heraldry, legends, superstitions, etc, by John Patterson MacLean, a publication from 1889 now in the public domain in the United States.

  1. ^ a b Scotland's Historic Heraldry. Boydell Press. ISBN 1-84383-261-5. A particularly interesting Scoto-Swedish family (Chart 20.4), whose members remained in touch with their Highland cousins, is that of MacLean or Macklier.... 
  2. ^ de la Caillemotte de Massue de Ruvigny, Melville Amadeus Henry Douglas Heddle (1904). The Jacobite Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Grants of Honour. Sir Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton (Maclean), fourth Lord Maclean, eighth Baronet, half-brother and next heir, being the only son of Donald Maclean named, by his second wife, Margaret, daughter of James Wall of Clonea Castle, co. Waterford. He was a General in the army and Colonel of the 45th regiment; served in the West Indies, at the capture of Tobago, attack on Martinique, etc.; Governor of St. Thomas and St . John. He died 5th July 1847. He married, first, Elizabeth, widow of John Bishop of Barbados, only child of Charles Kidd. She died 1832. He married secondly, 17th September 1838, Frances, widow of Henry Campion of Mailing Deanery, Sussex, daughter of ... 
  3. ^ a b A History of the Clan MacLean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle, in the Isle of Mull, to the Present Period: Including a Genealogical Account of Some of the Principal Families Together with Their Heraldry, Legends, Superstitions, Etc.. R. Clarke & Company. 1889. Sir Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton MacLean in early years made the profession of arms his choice. September 24, 1787, he obtained his commission as ensign in the twenty-ninth regiment, and rapidly rose to the rank of General, passing through the following grades: Lieutenant, June 19, 1788; Captain, July 15, 1793 ; Major, March, 1795; Lieutenant-Colonel, November 18, 1795; Colonel, September 25, 1803; Major-General, July 25. 1810; Lieutenant- General, June 4, 1814; General, January 10, 1837. In 1793, he was at the capture of the island of Tobago and in the attack on Martinique. In 1803. he was appointed commandant of the Batavians, who were received into the British service on the surrender of the Dutch West India colonies. In the expedition for the capture of Surinam, he commanded the advanced corps of the army. In 1805, he was at the capture of the Danish islands of St. Thomas and St. John, the government of which was conferred upon him in 1808, and continued as such until 1815. His administration of the affairs of thote islands, his impartial conduct, mild sway, and kind disposition, were such as to endear him to all classes of the inhabitants, and when he took his departure, it was amidst the universal regret of the people. For his gallant behavior at the capture of the island of Gaudaloupe, in 1810, he received and was permitted to wear a medal. In June, 1815, he returned to Europe, after passing, with very little interval, a period of twenty-eight years on active service in the hot climate of the West Indies. On his return he resided chiefly in London. In 1714, he married the widow of John Bishop, of Barbadoes, ami only child of Charles Kidd, and by her had several children, all of whom died in childhood except Charles Fitzroy and Donald. His wife dying in 1832, he married, September 17, 1838, Frances, widow of Henry Campion, of Sussex county. Sir Fitzroy J. G. MacLean died July 5, 1847. His son Donald became a, barrister at law and a member of parliament. He married, in 1827, Harriet, daughter of General Frederick Maitland, and died in 1874.