Sir Jacob Astley, 1st Baronet

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For the Civil War Soldier, see Jacob Astley, 1st Baron Astley of Reading.

Sir Jacob Astley, 1st Baronet (ca. 1639 – 17 August 1729)[1] was an English Tory politician and baronet.

Background[edit]

He was the oldest son of Edward Astley and his wife Elizabeth Astley, daughter of his uncle Jacob Astley, 1st Baron Astley of Reading.[2] Astley was educated first at Norwich School,[3] then King's College, Cambridge,[4] and finally Christ Church, Oxford, where he matriculated on 19 June 1659.[5] On 7 September of the same year on the death of his paternal uncle Sir Isaac Astley, 1st Baronet, he inherited the estates of Hill Morton and Melton Constable,[6] and in 1688 the estates of his cousin Jacob Astley, 3rd Baron Astley of Reading.[6]

Career[edit]

Having been already knighted, Astley was created a Baronet, of Hill Morton, in the County of Warwick on 26 June 1660.[6] He was appointed High Sheriff of Norfolk for 1664 before entering the British House of Commons in 1685 as MP for Norfolk until 1689.[7] He represented the constituency again from 1690 to 1701, from 1702 to 1705 and a last time from 1710 to 1722.[7] Astley was High Sheriff of Norfolk in 1664 and Commissioner of Trade between 1714 and 1717.[8]

Family[edit]

On 6 February 1661, he married Blanche Wodehouse, eldest daughter of Sir Philip Wodehouse, 3rd Baronet.[9] They had four sons and a daughter.[2] Astley was buried at Melton Constable few days after his death.[9] He was succeeded in the baronetcy by his second and oldest surviving son Philip.[2]MP Philip Metcalfe was his great-grandson.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Leigh Rayment - Baronetage". Retrieved 1 May 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c Debrett, John (1824). Debrett's Baronetage of England. vol. I (5th ed.). London: G. Woodfall. p. 219. 
  3. ^ Harries et al. (1991), p. 222
  4. ^ "Astley, Jacob (ASTY657J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  5. ^ Eveline Cruickshanks, Stuart Handley and D. W. Hayton, ed. (2002). The House of Commons, 1690-1715. vol. III. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 83. 
  6. ^ a b c Burke, John (1832). A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage of the British Empire. vol. I (4th ed.). London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 51. 
  7. ^ a b "Leigh Rayment - British House of Commons, Norfolk". Retrieved 1 May 2009. 
  8. ^ Haydn, Joseph (1851). The Book of Dignities: Containing Rolls of the Official Personages of the British Empire. London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longman's. p. 178. 
  9. ^ a b "ThePeerage - Sir Jacob Astley, 1st Bt". Retrieved 30 December 2006. 
Bibliography
  • Harries, R.; Cattermole, P.; Mackintosh, P. (1991). A History of Norwich School: King Edward VI's Grammar School at Norwich. Norwich: Friends of Norwich School. ISBN 978-0-9518561-1-6. 

External links[edit]

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir John Hobart
Sir Peter Gleane
Member of Parliament for Norfolk
1685–1689
With: Sir Thomas Hare
Succeeded by
Sir William Cook
Sir Henry Hobart
Preceded by
Sir William Cook
Sir Henry Hobart
Member of Parliament for Norfolk
1690–1701
With: Sir William Cook 1690–1695
Sir Henry Hobart 1695–1698
Sir William Cook 1698–1701
Roger Townshend 1701
Succeeded by
Roger Townshend
Sir John Holland
Preceded by
Roger Townshend
Sir John Holland
Member of Parliament for Norfolk
1702–1705
With: Sir John Holland
Succeeded by
Roger Townshend
Sir John Holland
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Ashe Windham
Sir John Holland
Member of Parliament for Norfolk
17101722
With: Sir John Wodehouse 1710–1713
Sir Edmund Bacon 1713–1715
Thomas de Grey 1715–1722
Succeeded by
Thomas de Grey
Thomas Coke
Baronetage of England
New creation Baronet
(of Hill Morton)
1660–1729
Succeeded by
Philip Astley