Six Assurances

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The Six Assurances are guidelines used in conducting relations between the United States of America and the Republic of China (Taiwan). They were proposed in 1982 by the Republic of China during negotiations between the United States and People's Republic of China over the Joint Communique on Arms Sales to Taiwan. The U.S. government agreed to these points and informed the United States Congress of this in July 1982. The Six assurances were:

  1. The United States would not set a date for ending arms sales to the Republic of China (ROC);
  2. The United States would not hold prior consultations with the People's Republic of China regarding arms sales to the ROC;
  3. The United States would not play a mediation role between the PRC and the ROC;
  4. The United States would not revise the Taiwan Relations Act;
  5. The United States would not alter its position regarding sovereignty over Taiwan; and
  6. The United States would not pressure Taiwan to enter into negotiations with the PRC.

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