FIS Ski Jumping World Cup

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FIS Ski Jumping World Cup
FIS World Cup.jpg
Overall/discipline globes
Genre Nordic skiing
Begins November (3rd/4th week)
Ends March (3rd week)
Frequency annual winter season
Location(s) Norway Norway
Slovenia Slovenia
Austria Austria
Germany Germany
Poland Poland
Japan Japan
Finland Finland
Russia Russia
Romania Romania
Czech Republic Czech Republic
Switzerland Switzerland
Years active 1979 - present
Inaugurated 27 December 1979 (27 December 1979)
Most recent Planica
Previous event Oslo
Next event Klingenthal
Participants 50 (ski jumping)
40 (ski flying)
30 (both season finals)
40 (ladies)
Attendance 20,000 - 40,000
Organised by International Ski Federation
People Walter Hofer (men)
Chika Yoshida (ladies)
Sponsor Viessmann, Konica Minolta
Website
fis-ski.com/ski-jumping

The FIS Ski Jumping World Cup is the world's highest level of ski jumping competition organized by the International Ski Federation since 1979. Women's competition was introduced in 2011.

The rounds are hosted primarily in Europe, with regular stops in Japan and rarely in North America. These have been hosted in over 18 different countries around the world, such as Austria, Bosnia, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Norway, Poland, Russia, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States.[1][nb 1]

Summer Grand Prix is the top level summer competition. The lower competitive circuits include Continental Cup, FIS Cup, FIS Race and Alpen Cup.

Scoring system[edit]

Each season consists of 25–30 competitions, usually two competitions on the same hill during a weekend. One competition consists of a qualifying round, first round and second round. The top 10 jumpers in FIS ranking qualify directly to the first round, while the rest of the jumpers fight for the remaining 40 spots. The top 30 men in the first round advance to the second round, which is held in reverse order, so the best jumper in the first round jumps last. The aggregate score in the first and second rounds determine the competition results. The top 30 are awarded World Cup points. The winner gets 100 points while number 30 receives 1 point. At team events only top 8 receive points.

Standings: Men[edit]

The table below shows the three highest ranked jumpers each year.

Standings: Ladies[edit]

Titles[edit]

  Still active ski jumpers are highlighted

Statistics: Men[edit]

Statistics: Ski Flying[edit]

Statistics: Ladies[edit]

Statistics: Team events[edit]

Timeline Calendar[edit]

Season   Men   Team (M)   Ladies   Mixed
FH LH NH Total FH LH NH Total LH NH Total NH Total
1979–80 1 16 8 25 - - - - - - - - -
1980–81 2 14 8 24 - - - - - - - - -
1981–82 3 10 9 22 - - - - - - - - -
1982–83 3 15 7 25 - - - - - - - - -
1983–84 2 14 8 24 - - - - - - - - -
1984–85 1 12 8 21 - - - - - - - - -
1985–86 2 14 9 25 - - - - - - - - -
1986–87 2 10 10 22 - - - - - - - - -
1987–88 - 12 8 20 - - - - - - - - -
1988–89 1 11 8 20 - - - - - - - - -
1989–90 - 16 9 25 - - - - - - - - -
1990–91 4 13 5 22 - - - - - - - - -
1991–92 3 12 6 21 - 2 - 2 - - - - -
1992–93 2 13 2 17 - 2 - 2 - - - - -
1993–94 1 11 7 19 - 2 - 2 - - - - -
1994–95 3 11 7 21 - 1 - 1 - - - - -
1995–96 3 16 9 28 - 4 - 4 - - - - -
1996–97 4 19 2 25 - 1 - 1 - - - - -
1997–98 4 19 4 27 - - - - - - - - -
1998–99 3 23 3 29 - 1 - 1 - - - - -
1999–00 2 22 2 26 1 2 - 3 - - - - -
2000–01 5 16 - 21 1 3 - 4 - - - - -
2001–02 - 21 1 22 1 3 1 5 - - - - -
2002–03 4 23 - 27 1 1 - 2 - - - - -
2003–04 1 22 - 23 - 2 - 2 - - - - -
2004–05 4 24 - 28 - 3 - 3 - - - - -
2005–06 2 20 - 22 - 2 - 2 - - - - -
2006–07 4 20 - 24 - 2 - 2 - - - - -
2007–08 3 22 2 27 1 2 - 3 - - - - -
2008–09 6 20 1 27 3 3 - 6 - - - - -
2009–10 3 20 - 23 1 3 - 4 - - - - -
2010–11 7 19 - 26 2 3 - 5 - - - - -
2011–12 5 20 1 26 2 3 1 6 - 13 13 - -
2012–13 7 17 3 27 2 4 - 6 1 15 16 1 1
2013–14 2 26 - 28 - 4 - 4 2 16 18 1 1
2014–15 5 25 1 31 1 4 - 5 1 12 13 - -
Total events 104 618 148 870 16 57 2 75 4 56 60 2 2
Double wins 1 8 1 10 - - - - - 2 2 - -
Total winners 105 626 149 880 16 57 2 75 4 58 62 2 2

Last updated: 22 March 2015

World Cup winners by nations[edit]

The table below lists those nations which have won at least one World Cup race (current as of 22 March 2015).

Rank Nation Number of wins   Number of wins by hill size
Men Team (M) Ladies Mixed Total Men   Team (M)   Ladies   Mixed
FH LH NH FH LH NH LH NH NH
1  Austria 234 27 11 - 272 37 160 37 5 21 1 - 11 -
2  Finland 151 15 - - 166 15 102 34 4 10 1 - - -
3  Norway 98 13 1 1 113 11 70 17 3 10 - - 1 1
4  Germany (1990- ) 98 8 2 - 108 11 77 10 1 7 - - 2 -
5  Japan 62 4 30 1 97 9 40 13 - 4 - 3 27 1
6  Poland 61 - - - 61 7 51 3 - - - - - -
7  Slovenia (1991- ) 32 8 1 - 41 10 21 1 3 5 - - 1 -
8   Switzerland 33 - 1 - 34 1 30 2 - - - - 1 -
9  East Germany (1979-90) 28 - - - 28 - 20 8 - - - - - -
10  Czechoslovakia (1979-92) 19 - - - 19 - 12 7 - - - - - -
11  United States 3 - 13 - 16 - 3 - - - - 1 12 -
12  Czech Republic (1993- ) 16 - - - 16 3 13 - - - - - - -
13  Canada 14 - - - 14 - 6 8 - - - - - -
14  Yugoslavia (1979-91) 10 - - - 10 - 6 4 - - - - - -
15  Sweden 7 - - - 7 1 5 1 - - - - - -
15  Italy 7 - - - 7 - 4 3 - - - - - -
17  West Germany (1979-90) 6 - - - 6 - 5 1 - - - - - -
18  France 1 - 2 - 3 - 1 - - - - - 2 -
19  Russia - - 1 - 1 - - - - - - - 1 -
Total 880 75 62 2 1019 105 626 149 16 57 2 4 58 2

Hosts[edit]

All-time records[edit]

Race Directors[edit]

At time this new function called Race Director was introduced by FIS in 1992/93 with its first president Walter Hofer. Before that season this function didn't exist.[2] In the premiere Ladies 2011/12 World Cup season Chika Yoshida was entitled as World Cup Coordinator, but since the season 2012/13 Yoshida is called Race Director.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Note that the rounds hosted in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Slovakia were held when the countries were still part of Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia respectively.

References[edit]

External links[edit]