Skillet Glacier

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Skillet Glacier
Mt Moran summit WY1.jpg
Skillet Glacier on Mount Moran is at right. On the left is Falling Ice Glacier
Map showing the location of Skillet Glacier
Map showing the location of Skillet Glacier
Skillet Glacier
Grand Teton National Park, Teton County, Wyoming, USA
Type Mountain glacier
Coordinates 43°50′12″N 110°45′57″W / 43.83667°N 110.76583°W / 43.83667; -110.76583Coordinates: 43°50′12″N 110°45′57″W / 43.83667°N 110.76583°W / 43.83667; -110.76583[1]
Area 175 acres (0.71 km2)
Length 0.5 mi (0.80 km)
Terminus rockfall
Status unknown

Skillet Glacier is in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, United States.[2] The glacier is situated on the eastern cliffs of Mount Moran and is easily seen from Jackson Hole. The shape of the glacier led to the naming as the uppermost section of the glacier is long and narrow and then broadens abruptly more than halfway down the mountain into a larger area, giving it the shape of a skillet or frying pan. The glacier is one of twelve that remain in Grand Teton National Park and one of five glaciers located on Mount Moran.[3] Mountain climbers consider the Skillet Glacier route to be the fastest and one of the easiest ways to climb Mount Moran, and was the route taken when the peak was first climbed in 1922, though it is rarely used in late summer due to poor footing. On November 21, 1950, A DC-3 crashed into Mount Moran, adjacent to Skillet Glacier, killing all 21 passengers aboard. The remains of the passengers and the plane are still on the mountain.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Skillet Glacier". Geographic Names Information System. U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-08-12. 
  2. ^ TopoQwest (United States Geological Survey Maps). Mount Moran, WY (Map). http://www.topoquest.com/map.php?lat=43.83712&lon=-110.76401&datum=nad83&zoom=4. Retrieved 2012-08-12.
  3. ^ "Glaciers". Nature and Science. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. Retrieved 2012-08-12. 
  4. ^ Macha, G. Pat. "Mt. Moran DC-3 N74586". Aircraft Wrecks in the Mountains and Deserts of the American West. G. Pat Macha. Retrieved 2012-08-12.