Skyline

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A skyline is the artificial horizon that a city's overall structure creates. Skylines serve as a kind of fingerprint of a city, as no two skylines are alike. For this reason news and sports programs, television shows, and movies often display the skyline of a city to set location. The Sky Line of New York City was a new term in 1896, when it was the title of a color lithograph by Charles Graham for the color supplement of the New-York Journal.[1]

Paul D. Spreiregen, FAIA, has called a skyline "a physical representation [of a city's] facts of life ... a potential work of art ... its collective vista."[2]

Gallery[edit]

The skyline of Hong Kong
The skyline of Hong Kong

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ New York Public Library: "Moving Uptown": "When Charles Graham's view of New York was published, the new term used in the title, "sky line," caught on immediately."
  2. ^ Paul D. Spreiregen (1965). Urban Design: The Architecture of Towns and Cities. McGraw-Hill. 

External links[edit]