Slashtag

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Slashtags are a set of short community-created conventions for attributing information on Twitter, also called microsyntax.[1] They are designed to be succinct and provide an easy way to provide metadata about a tweet, especially when "retweeting".

History[edit]

Slashtags were introduced by Chris Messina and given their moniker by Chris Blow.[2][3]

Usage[edit]

A slashtag is preceded by the "/" character (called a slasher). It is stated that after the initial slash, the slasher is not required for subsequent slashtags. Slashtags normally appear at the end of a tweet.

Current slashtags[edit]

Examples[edit]

These are example tweets with fictitious Twitter usernames to show how to use Slashtags.

  • Here is something I think everyone would find useful: <URL> /cc @someInterestedParty
  • Something someone else said. /by @thePersonWhoSaidIt
  • RT @OriginalSource Retweeted text. /via @3rdPartyYouHeardItFrom
  • I stand corrected. The info you want is here <URL> /thx @PersonWhoInformedYou

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / Slashtags". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  2. ^ "FactoryCity » New microsyntax for Twitter: three pointers and the slasher". Factoryjoe.com. 2009-09-24. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  3. ^ "'Slashtags' for citizen editors". Chris Blow Unthinkingly blog. November 9, 2009. Archived from the original on 2009-11-12. 
  4. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / by". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  5. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / cc". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  6. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / for". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  7. ^ Chris Messina. wiki/tip "microsyntax / tip". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  8. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / thx". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  9. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / hat tip". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  10. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / via". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 
  11. ^ Chris Messina. "microsyntax / OH". Microsyntax wiki. Retrieved 2013-12-30.