Slocan, British Columbia

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Slocan
Village
Village of Slocan[1]
Slocan city skyline.jpg
Slocan is located in British Columbia
Slocan
Slocan
Location of Slocan in British Columbia
Coordinates: 49°45′58″N 117°28′6″W / 49.76611°N 117.46833°W / 49.76611; -117.46833
Country  Canada
Province  British Columbia
Region West Kootenay (Slocan Valley)
Regional district Central Kootenay
Incorporated 1901
Government
 • Governing body Slocan Village Council
 • Mayor Madeleine Perriere
Area
 • Total 0.78 km2 (0.30 sq mi)
Elevation 450 m (1,480 ft)
Population (2011)
 • Total 296
 • Density 381.7/km2 (989/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
Highways 6
Waterways Slocan Lake, Slocan River

The Village of Slocan (IPA: [sɬuqan]; English pronunciation: /sloʊˈkæn/, SLOH-kan), historically also known as Slocan City, (/ˈsloʊkæn sɪtɪ/, SLOH-kan), from Ktunaxa: sǂuqan, IPA: [sɬuqan]).[2] is a village in the Slocan Valley of the West Kootenay region of the southeastern Interior of British Columbia, Canada. It is located at the southern end of Slocan Lake, to the south of New Denver, which sits mid-way up the lake's eastern shore.

Name[edit]

The name Slocan is derived from the Sinixt word meaning "to strike or pierce on head" and was derived from their practice of harpooning salmon.[citation needed] At one time, this area had an abundance of salmon. The term Slocan is also in the Ktunaxa language.

Slocan should not be confused with Slocan Park, which is farther south along the Slocan River, or South Slocan, at the Slocan River's confluence with the Kootenay River. The term "the Slocan" refers to the Slocan Valley in general.

History[edit]

Slocan City in 1920

The townsite was staked at the lower end of Slocan Lake in 1892 following massive silver strikes nearby. The site was conveniently close to three principal ore producing areas. By 1900, there were 12 hotels in Slocan; by 1920 there were only three. Slocan became a city in June 1901 and reverted to village status in June 1958.

During the 1890s, Slocan City was a bustling, boisterous, boomtown filled with hotels, saloons, pack teams, rail cars filled with ore, and miners in pursuit of the ever elusive mother lode.

During World War II, Slocan was one of the Japanese Canadian internment camps in British Columbia. Among those interned at the Slocan camp were celebrity scientist David Suzuki, and author Joy Kogawa.[3] Other internment camps in the area were at Lemon Creek, just south of Slocan, and at New Denver.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Slocan
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 10
(50)
14.5
(58.1)
22.5
(72.5)
30
(86)
35.5
(95.9)
38
(100)
41
(106)
39.5
(103.1)
36.1
(97)
26.1
(79)
17.2
(63)
11.7
(53.1)
41
(106)
Average high °C (°F) −0.2
(31.6)
3.6
(38.5)
9.3
(48.7)
15.5
(59.9)
20.4
(68.7)
24.2
(75.6)
28
(82)
28.5
(83.3)
21.7
(71.1)
13.8
(56.8)
4.8
(40.6)
0.2
(32.4)
14.1
(57.4)
Average low °C (°F) −7.1
(19.2)
−4.9
(23.2)
−2.3
(27.9)
1
(34)
4.9
(40.8)
8.5
(47.3)
10.1
(50.2)
10
(50)
5.8
(42.4)
1.4
(34.5)
−1.9
(28.6)
−5.9
(21.4)
1.6
(34.9)
Record low °C (°F) −31.7
(−25.1)
−30.6
(−23.1)
−22.2
(−8)
−7.8
(18)
−6.1
(21)
0
(32)
2.8
(37)
2.2
(36)
−4.4
(24.1)
−11
(12)
−23.5
(−10.3)
−35
(−31)
−35
(−31)
Precipitation mm (inches) 94
(3.7)
69.8
(2.748)
62.4
(2.457)
61
(2.4)
68.2
(2.685)
71.1
(2.799)
54.4
(2.142)
49.4
(1.945)
51.4
(2.024)
61.6
(2.425)
104
(4.09)
105.9
(4.169)
853.2
(33.591)
Source: Environment Canada[4]

Attractions[edit]

Currently, Slocan is a resting point for travellers en route to Valhalla Provincial Park.

Television[edit]

Slocan City was featured on the historical television series Gold Trails and Ghost Towns, season 2, episode 7.

References[edit]

Coordinates: 49°45′46″N 117°27′45″W / 49.76278°N 117.46250°W / 49.76278; -117.46250

External links[edit]