Slovak parliamentary election, 1994

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politics and government of
Slovakia

Parliamentary elections were held in Slovakia on 30 September and 1 October 1994.[1] The early elections were necessary after the Vladimír Mečiar 1992 government had been recalled in March 1994 by the National Council and a new temporary government under Jozef Moravčík had been created at the same time.

The governing Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) lost seats, but remained the largest party in the National Council with over three times as many seats as the second-placed Common Choice, a left-wing alliance, which also lost seats. After the election, the HZDS formed a left-wing nationalist coalition with the Union of the Workers of Slovakia and the Slovak National Party.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Movement for a Democratic Slovakia-Peasant's Party of Slovakia 1,005,488 35.0 61 –13
Common Choice 299,469 10.4 18 –11
Party of the Hungarian Coalition 292,936 10.2 17 +3
Christian Democratic Movement 289,987 10.1 17 –1
Democratic Union of Slovakia 246,444 8.6 15 New
Union of the Workers of Slovakia 211,321 7.3 13 New
Slovak National Party 155,359 5.4 9 –6
Democratic Party 98,555 3.4 0 0
Communist Party of Slovakia 78,419 2.7 0
Christian Social Union 59,217 2.1 0
New Slovakia 38,369 1.3 0
Anti-Corruption Party 37,929 1.3 0
Movement for a Prosperous Czech Republic and Slovakia 30,292 1.1 0
Roma Civic Initiative 19,542 0.7 0
Social Democracy 7,121 0.2 0
Real Social Democratic Party of Slovaks 3,573 0.1 0
Association for the Republic–The Republicans 1,410 0.0 0
Invalid/blank votes 57,211
Total 2,932,669 100 150 0
Registered voters/turnout 3,876,555 75.7
Source: Nohlen & Stöver
Popular Vote
HZDS/RSS
  
34.97%
SV
  
10.41%
MK
  
10.19%
KDH
  
10.08%
  
8.57%
ZRS
  
7.35%
SNS
  
5.40%
DS
  
3.43%
KSS
  
2.73%
KSÚ
  
2.06%
NS
  
1.33%
SPK
  
1.32%
HZPČS
  
1.05%
Other
  
1.10%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1747 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7